Etymology
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Shasta 
mountain in California, named for local native tribe, for whose name Bright offers no etymology.
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medical (n.)

1917, short for medical examination. Earlier it was colloquial for "a student or practitioner of medicine" (1823).

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money-bag (n.)

1560s, "a bag for money, a purse," from money + bag (n.). Slang moneybags for "rich person" is by 1818.

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meet (n.)

1831 in the sporting sense, "a gathering of huntsmen for fox-hunting," from meet (v.). Later of bicyclists gathering for a ride, etc.

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boondoggle (n.)
"A trivial, useless, or unnecessary undertaking; wasteful expenditure" [OED], 1935, American English, of uncertain origin, popularized during the New Deal as a contemptuous word for make-work projects for the unemployed. Said to have been a pioneer word for "gadget;" it also was by 1932 a Boy Scout term for a kind of woven braid.
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raison d'etre (n.)

"excuse for being," 1864, first recorded in letter of J.S. Mill, from French raison d'être, literally "rational grounds for existence."

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elevator (n.)

1640s, originally of muscles which raise a part of the body, from Latin elevator "one who raises up," agent noun from past participle stem of elevare (see elevate). As a name for a mechanical lift (originally for grain) attested from 1787. Elevator music for bland, low-volume background music meant to relax listeners is attested by 1963. Elevator as a lift for shoes is from 1940.

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bathroom (n.)
also bath-room, 1780, from bath + room (n.). Originally a room with apparatus for bathing (the only definition in "Century Dictionary," 1902); it came to be used 20c. in U.S. as a euphemism for a lavatory and often is noted as a word that confuses British travelers. To go to the bathroom, euphemism for "relieve oneself; urinate, defecate," is from 1920 (in a book for children), but typically is used without regard for whether an actual bathroom is involved.
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requital (n.)

"return for some service, kindness, etc.; act of requiting" for good or ill, 1570s, from requite + -al (2).

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Sterno (n.)
U.S. proprietary name for solidified alcohol used as fuel for cooking stoves, 1915, by S. Sternau & Co., New York, N.Y. Noted by 1935 as a source of dangerous but cheap alcohol for drinking.
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