Etymology
Advertisement
Ice-Capade (n.)
1941, originally a film title, from ice (n.) + a punning play on escapade.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
glockenspiel (n.)

1825 as a type of organ-stop 1834 as a musical instrument consisting of small bells or metal bars struck by hammers, from German Glockenspiel, literally "play of bells," from plural of Glocke "bell" (see clock (n.1)) + Spiel "a play" (see spiel).

Related entries & more 
footsie (n.)
"amorous play with the feet" [OED], 1944, from foot (n.). Footie in the same sense is from 1935.
Related entries & more 
allude (v.)

1530s, "to mock" (transitive, now obsolete), from French alluder or directly from Latin alludere "to play, make fun of, joke, jest," also of waves lapping the shore, from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + ludere "to play" (see ludicrous). Meaning "make an indirect reference, point in passing" is from 1530s. Related: Alluded; alluding.

Related entries & more 
dramatis personae 

"the characters in a play," Latin for "persons of a drama." From the genitive of Late Latin drama and the plural of persona.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
lark (v.)
"to play tricks, frolic," 1813; see lark (n.2). Related: Larked; larking.
Related entries & more 
neatnik (n.)
"excessively tidy person," 1959, from neat (adj.) with a punning play on beatnik.
Related entries & more 
everyman (n.)
name of the leading character in a popular 15c. morality play; from every + man (n.).
Related entries & more 
ludicrous (adj.)

1610s, "pertaining to play or sport" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin ludicrus "sportive" (source of Old French ludicre), from ludicrum "amusement, game, toy, source of amusement, joke," from ludere "to play."

This verb, along with Latin ludus "a game, play," is from the PIE root *leid- or *loid- "to play," perhaps literally "to let go frequently" [de Vaan], which is the source also of Middle Irish laidid "impels;" Greek lindesthai "to contend," lizei "plays;" Albanian lind "gives birth," lindet "is born;" Old Lithuanian leidmi "I let," Lithuanian leisti "to let," laidyti "to throw," Latvian laist "let, publish, set in motion."

Sense of "ridiculous, apt to evoke ridicule or jest" is attested from 1782. Related: Ludicrously; ludicrousness.

Related entries & more 
drama (n.)

1510s, "a composition presenting in dialogue a course of human action, the description of a story converted into the action of a play," from Late Latin drama "play, drama," from Greek drama (genitive dramatos) "action, deed; play, spectacle," from drāo "to do, make, act, perform" (especially some great deed, whether good or bad), which is of uncertain etymology.

Meaning "theatrical literature generally, drama as art" is from 1660s. Extended sense of "sequence of events or actions leading up to a climax" is by 1714. Drama queen "person who habitually responds to situations in a melodramatic way" is attested by 1992.

Related entries & more 

Page 7