Etymology
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footsie (n.)
"amorous play with the feet" [OED], 1944, from foot (n.). Footie in the same sense is from 1935.
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bop (v.)

"to hit, strike, punch," 1931, imitative. As a noun from 1934. Sense of "play bop music, play (a song) in a bop style" is from 1948, from bop (n.). It soon came to mean "do any sort of dance to pop music" (1956). Related: Bopped; bopping.

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grundyism (n.)
"social censorship of personal conduct in the name of conventional propriety," 1836, from Mrs. Grundy, prudish character in Thomas Morton's 1798 play "Speed the Plow," play and playwright otherwise now forgotten, but the line "What would Mrs. Grundy say?" became proverbial.
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allude (v.)

1530s, "to mock" (transitive, now obsolete), from French alluder or directly from Latin alludere "to play, make fun of, joke, jest," also of waves lapping the shore, from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + ludere "to play" (see ludicrous). Meaning "make an indirect reference, point in passing" is from 1530s. Related: Alluded; alluding.

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neatnik (n.)
"excessively tidy person," 1959, from neat (adj.) with a punning play on beatnik.
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everyman (n.)
name of the leading character in a popular 15c. morality play; from every + man (n.).
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dramatis personae 

"the characters in a play," Latin for "persons of a drama." From the genitive of Late Latin drama and the plural of persona.

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lark (v.)
"to play tricks, frolic," 1813; see lark (n.2). Related: Larked; larking.
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ludicrous (adj.)

1610s, "pertaining to play or sport" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin ludicrus "sportive" (source of Old French ludicre), from ludicrum "amusement, game, toy, source of amusement, joke," from ludere "to play."

This verb, along with Latin ludus "a game, play," is from the PIE root *leid- or *loid- "to play," perhaps literally "to let go frequently" [de Vaan], which is the source also of Middle Irish laidid "impels;" Greek lindesthai "to contend," lizei "plays;" Albanian lind "gives birth," lindet "is born;" Old Lithuanian leidmi "I let," Lithuanian leisti "to let," laidyti "to throw," Latvian laist "let, publish, set in motion."

Sense of "ridiculous, apt to evoke ridicule or jest" is attested from 1782. Related: Ludicrously; ludicrousness.

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drama (n.)

1510s, "a composition presenting in dialogue a course of human action, the description of a story converted into the action of a play," from Late Latin drama "play, drama," from Greek drama (genitive dramatos) "action, deed; play, spectacle," from drāo "to do, make, act, perform" (especially some great deed, whether good or bad), which is of uncertain etymology.

Meaning "theatrical literature generally, drama as art" is from 1660s. Extended sense of "sequence of events or actions leading up to a climax" is by 1714. Drama queen "person who habitually responds to situations in a melodramatic way" is attested by 1992.

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