Etymology
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charismatic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to charisma," 1851, in Bible commentary and theology, in reference to the operation of the Holy Spirit and prophetic ecstasy in the early Church (from the use of Greek kharismata in Romans xii), from Latin stem of charisma + -ic. As a movement in modern Christianity emphasizing divine gifts of healing, tongues, etc., attested by 1936, reflecting the older sense of charisma.

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pacification (n.)

"a setting at peace," mid-15c., pacificacioun, from Old French pacification "act of making peaceful" (15c.) and directly from Latin pacificationem (nominative pacificatio) "a peace-making," noun of action from past-participle stem of pacificare "to pacify" (see pacify). As "military operation designed to secure local cooperation in an area where enemy forces are thought to be active," by 1946.

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tachymeter (n.)

surveying instrument, 1836, from tachy- "swift" + -meter. Related: Tachymetry.

M. GAETANO CAÏRO has invented an instrument, to which he has given the name of Tachymeter (rapid measurer). Its object is to give the area of plane surfaces bounded by any outline whatever, without the necessity of any arithmetical operation. [Magazine of Popular Science and Journal of the Useful Arts, vol. ii, 1836]
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excision (n.)

"the act of full or partial cutting off or away by surgical operation," especially of a small, diseased part of the body, late 15c. (Caxton), from Old French excision (14c.) and directly from Latin excisionem (nominative excisio) "a destroying," noun of action from past-participle stem of excidere "to cut out; destroy," from ex "out" (see ex-) + -cidere, combining form of caedere "to cut down" (from PIE root *kae-id- "to strike").

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preparation (n.)

late 14c., preparacioun, "act of preparing or making ready, preliminary act or operation, a previous setting in order," from Old French preparacion (13c.) and directly from Latin praeparationem (nominative praeparatio) "a making ready," noun of action from past participle stem of praeparare "prepare," from prae "before" (see pre-) + parare "make ready" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure"). Meaning "a substance especially prepared or manufactured" is from 1640s.

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burn (n.)

c. 1300, "act or operation of burning," from Old English bryne, from the same source as burn (v.). Until mid-16c. the usual spelling was brenne. Meaning "mark or injury made by burning" is from 1520s. Slow burn is attested by 1938, in reference to U.S. movie actor Edgar Kennedy (1890-1948), who made it his specialty.

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agency (n.)

1650s, "active operation;" 1670s, "a mode of exerting power or producing effect," from Medieval Latin agentia, abstract noun from Latin agentem (nominative agens) "effective, powerful," present participle of agere "to set in motion, drive forward; to do, perform," figuratively "incite to action; keep in movement" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move"). The meaning "establishment where business is done for another" is recorded by 1861.

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avast (interj.)

1680s, a nautical interjection, "hold! stop!" probably worn down from Dutch houd vast "hold fast." See hold (v.) + fast (adv.).

AVAST. — The order to stop, or pause, in any exercise or operation; as Avast heaving — that is to say, desist, or stop, from drawing in the cable or hawser, by means of the capstan &c. [George Biddlecombe, "The Art of Rigging," 1848]
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dissection (n.)

1580s, "operation of cutting open or separating into parts," from French dissection (16c.) or directly from Medieval Latin dissectionem (nominative dissectio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin dissecare "cut in pieces," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + secare "to cut" (from PIE root *sek- "to cut"). Meaning "process of cutting open an animal or plant for examination of organs and tissues" is from c. 1600. Transferred sense of "act of separating anything into distinct parts for critical examination" is from 1640s.

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operationalize (v.)

1954, in psychology, "express in operational terms," from operational + -ize. Related: Operationalized; operationalizing; operationalization (1966).

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