Etymology
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one-off (n.)

"single example of a manufactured product," by 1927, from one + off. Later given figurative extension.

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offshoring (n.)

in the economic sense, as a form of outsourcing, attested by 1988, from off-shore.

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hands-off (adj.)

by 1895, from verbal phrase; see hand (n.) + off (adv.). Hands off! as a command to desist is by 1810.

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piss off (v.)

1958, intransitive, "go away," chiefly British; the transitive meaning "annoy (someone)" is by 1968, chiefly U.S.; from piss (v.) + off (adv.). Pissed off "angry, fed up" is attested by 1946 (Partridge says 1937); said to have been used in the military in World War II; in common use from 1970s.

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official (adj.)

late 14c., "performing a service" (a sense now obsolete); c. 1400, "required by duty," from Old French oficial "official; main, principal" (14c., Modern French officiel) and directly from Late Latin officialis "of or belonging to duty, service, or office," from Latin officium "service, kindness, favor; official duty, function, business; ceremonial observance," literally "work-doing," from ops (genitive opis) "power, might, abundance, means" (related to opus "work," from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance") + combining form of facere "to make, to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

Meaning "pertaining to an office or official position" is from c. 1600. That of "derived from the proper office or officer," hence "authorized," is by 1854.

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off-ramp (n.)

"sloping one-way road leading off a main highway," 1954, from off- (adj.), from off (prep.), + ramp (n.).

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offender (n.)

early 15c., offendour, "a lawbreaker; a sinner," agent noun from offend (v.). Earlier was offendour (early 15c.), from Anglo-French.

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offensive (n.)

1720, the offensive, "condition of attacking, an aggressive action or course," from offensive (adj.). Military sense of "forceful action toward a particular end" is by 1918, from World War I.

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blast-off (n.)

"initial burst of energy that launches a rocket into space," 1950, from the verbal phrase; see blast (v.) + off (adv.).

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officialdom (n.)

"officials collectively or as a class," often disparaging, 1863, from official (n.) + -dom.

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