Etymology
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inconsideration (n.)
1520s, "indiscretion, rashness, failure to consider," from Late Latin inconsiderationem (nominative inconsideratio) "inconsiderateness," from Latin inconsideratus "headstrong, thoughtless" (see inconsiderate).
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circumlocution (n.)

"a roundabout way of speaking, studied indirection or evasiveness in speaking or writing," c. 1400, from Latin circumlocutionem (nominative circumlocutio) "a speaking around" (the topic), from circum "around, round about" (see circum-) + locutionem (nominative locutio) "a speaking," noun of action from past participle stem of loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak"). A loan-translation of Greek periphrasis (see periphrasis). Related: Circumlocutionary.

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malevolence (n.)

"the character of being ill-disposed toward another or others; ill-will, malice, personal hatred," mid-15c., from Old French malevolence and directly from Latin malevolentia "ill-will, dislike, hatred," from malevolentem (nominative malevolens) "ill-disposed, wishing ill, spiteful, envious," from male "badly" (see mal-) + volentem (nominative volens), present participle of velle "to wish" (see will (v.)) 

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fluctuant (adj.)
"moving like a wave," 1550s, from Latin fluctuantem (nominative fluctuans), present participle of fluctuare "to move in waves" (see fluctuation).
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equability (n.)
1530s, from Latin aequabilitatem (nominative aequabilitas) "equality, uniformity, evenness," figuratively "impartiality," from aequabilis "equal, consistent, uniform" (see equable).
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subornation (n.)
1520s, from Latin subornationem (nominative subornatio), noun of action from past participle stem of subornare "to provide, furnish; instigate"(see suborn).
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communicant (n.)

"one who takes communion," 1550s, from Latin communicantem (nominative communicans), present participle of communicare (see communication, and compare communion).

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legality (n.)

mid-15c., "law-abiding behavior or character," from Medieval Latin legalitatem (nominative legalitas), from Latin legalis "pertaining to the law" (see legal).

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variant (adj.)
late 14c., "tending to change," from Old French variant and directly from Latin variantem (nominative varians), present participle of variare "to change" (see vary).
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Brahma 
1785, from Sanskrit Brahma, nominative of Brahman, chief god of the trinity Brahma-Vishnu-Siva in post-Vedic Hindu religion (see brahmin).
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