Etymology
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bobbin (n.)
"pin or spool around which thread or yarn is wound," 1520s, from French bobine, small instrument used in sewing or tapestry-making, of uncertain origin, perhaps from Latin balbus (see babble (v.)) for the stuttering, stammering noise it made.
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dissonant (adj.)

early 15c., dissonaunt, "at variance, disagreeing," from Old French dissonant (13c.) and directly from Latin dissonantem (nominative dissonans), present participle of dissonare "differ in sound," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + sonare "to sound, make a noise" (from PIE root *swen- "to sound"). The meaning "discordant in sound, harsh" is from 1570s. Related: Dissonantly.

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Grinch (n.)
"spoilsport;" all usages trace to Dr. Seuss's 1957 book "How the Grinch Stole Christmas." Kipling used grinching (1892) in reference to a harsh, grating noise; and Grinch had been used as the surname of severe characters in fiction at least since 1903.
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sound (v.1)

early 13c., sounen "to be audible, produce vibrations affecting the ear," from Old French soner (Modern French sonner) and directly from Latin sonare "to sound, make a noise" (from PIE root *swen- "to sound"). From late 14c. as "cause something (an instrument, etc.) to produce sound." Related: Sounded; sounding.

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rumor (n.)

"unsubstantiated report, gossip, hearsay;" also "tidings, news, a current report with or without foundation," late 14c., from Old French rumor "commotion, widespread noise or report" (Modern French rumeur), from Latin rumorem (nominative rumor) "noise, clamor; common talk, hearsay, popular opinion," which is related to ravus "hoarse" (from PIE *reu- "to bellow").

Dutch rumoer, German Rumor are from French. The sense of "loud protest, clamor, outcry" also was borrowed in Middle English but is now archaic or poetic. Also compare rumorous "making a loud, confused sound" (1540s). Rumor-monger is by 1884 (earlier in that sense was rumorer, c. 1600). The figurative rumor mill is by 1887.

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hullabaloo (n.)
1762, hollo-ballo (with many variant spellings) "uproar, racket, noisy commotion," chiefly in northern England and Scottish, perhaps a rhyming reduplication of hollo (see hello). Bartlett ("Dictionary of Americanisms," 1848) has it as hellabaloo "riotous noise; confusion," and says it is provincial in England.
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flurry (n.)
"snow squall" 1828, American English; earlier with a sense of "commotion, state of perturbed action" (1710), "a gust, a squall" (1690s); perhaps imitative, or else from 17c. flurr "to scatter, fly with a whirring noise," which is perhaps from Middle English flouren "to sprinkle, as with flour" (late 14c.).
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snorkel (n.)
1944, "airshaft for submarines," from German Schnorchel, from German navy slang Schnorchel "nose, snout," related to schnarchen "to snore" (see snore (n.)). So called from its resemblance to a nose and its noise when in use. The Englished spelling first recorded 1949. The meaning "curved tube used by a swimmer to breathe under water" is first recorded 1951.
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explode (v.)

1530s (transitive), "to reject with scorn," from Latin explodere "drive out or off by clapping, hiss off, hoot off," originally theatrical, "to drive an actor off the stage by making noise," hence "drive out, reject, destroy the repute of" (a sense surviving in an exploded theory), from ex "out" (see ex-) + plaudere "to clap the hands, applaud," which is of uncertain origin. Athenian audiences were highly demonstrative. clapping and shouting approval, stamping, hissing, and hooting for disapproval. The Romans seem to have done likewise.

At the close of the performance of a comedy in the Roman theatre one of the actors dismissed the audience, with a request for their approbation, the expression being usually plaudite, vos plaudite, or vos valete et plaudite. [William Smith, "A First Latin Reading Book," 1890]

English used it to mean "drive out with violence and sudden noise" (1650s), later "cause to burst suddenly and noisily" (1794). Intransitive sense of "go off with a loud noise" is from 1790, American English; figurative sense of "to burst with destructive force" is by 1882; that of "burst into sudden activity" is from 1817; of population by 1959. Related: Exploded; exploding.

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yammer (v.)
late 15c., "to lament," probably from Middle Dutch jammeren and cognate Middle English yeoumeren, "to mourn, complain," from Old English geomrian "to lament," from geomor "sorrowful," probably of imitative origin. Cognate with Old Saxon jamar "sad, sorrowful," German Jammer "lamentation, misery." Meaning "to make loud, annoying noise" is attested from 1510s. Related: Yammered; yammering.
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