Etymology
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sunrise (n.)

mid-15c., from sun (n.) + rise (v.); perhaps it evolved from a Middle English subjunctive, such as before the sun rise. Earlier in same sense were sunrist (mid-14c.); sunrising (mid-13c.). Compare sunset.

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plow-wright (n.)

"one who makes and repairs plows," mid-15c., plough-wrighte (mid-13c. as a surname), from plow (n.) + wright (n.).

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likewise (adv.)

mid-15c., from the phrase in like wise "in the same manner" (mid-15c.), from like (adj.) + wise (n.).

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dyer (n.)

"one whose occupation is to dye cloths, skins, etc.," mid-14c. (mid-13c. as a surname), agent noun from dye (v.).

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piller (n.)

"plunderer," mid-14c., pilour, from obsolete verb pill "to plunder, to pillage" (see pillage (v.)). Related: Pillery "robbery, plunder" (mid-15c.).

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carder (n.)

"one who cards wool, etc., for spinning," mid-15c. (mid-14c. as a surname), agent noun from card (v.2).

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tadpole (n.)

mid-15c., from tadde "toad" (see toad) + pol "head" (see poll (n.)). Also pol-head (mid 13c.).

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tried (adj.)

"tested, proven, trusty," mid-14c., past-participle adjective from try (v.). Coupled since mid-14c. with true.

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weaver (n.)

mid-14c. (mid-13c. as a surname), agent noun from weave (v.). The weaver-bird (1826) so called from the ingenuity of its nests.

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commoner (n.)

late 14c. (mid-14c. in Anglo-French), "one of the common people, a member of the third estate," agent noun from common (v.) "participate in common, associate or have dealings with" (mid-14c.), from common (adj.). From mid-15c. as "member of the House of Commons."

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