Etymology
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percuss (v.)

1550s, "to strike," from French percussir, from Latin percussus, past participle of percutere "to strike hard, beat" (see percussion). Especially, in medicine, "to tap or strike for diagnostic purposes" (1821, implied in percussed). Related: Percussing.

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hepatic (adj.)

late 14c., epatike, from Old French hepatique or directly from Latin hepaticus "pertaining to the liver," from Greek hēpatikos, from hēpar (genitive hēpatos) "liver" (see hepatitis). As a noun, "medicine for the liver," from late 15c.

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lenitive (adj.)

"assuaging, palliating," early 15c., from Medieval Latin lenitivus, from Latin lenitus, past participle of lenire "to soften, alleviate, pacify" (from PIE root *‌‌lē- "to let go, slacken"). As a noun, "a lenitive medicine," from early 15c.

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analeptic (adj.)
1660s, in medicine, "restorative, invigorating, strengthening," from Latinized form of Greek analeptikos "restorative," from analambanein "to restore, repair," literally "take up," from ana "up" (see ana-) + lambanein "to take" (see lemma). Related: Analeptical (1610s).
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choler (n.)

late 14c., "bile," as one of the humors, an excess of which was supposed in old medicine to cause irascibility or temper, from Old French colere "bile, anger," from Late Latin cholera "bile" (see cholera).

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relapse (n.)

mid-15c., "a falling back into error or wrongdoing, moral backsliding," from relapse (v.) or else from Medieval Latin relapsus. In medicine, "a falling back into a disease or symptom during or after convalescence," from 1580s.

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ecosphere (n.)
region around a star where conditions allow life-bearing planets to exist, 1953; see eco- + sphere. Apparently coined by German-born U.S. physician and space medicine pioneer Hubertus Strughold (1898-1986).
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gamboge (n.)
type of gum-resin from Southeast Asia, used in Europe as a yellow dye and as a purgative in medicine, 1630, in widely varying spellings, from Modern Latin cambogium, ultimately from the source of the place name Cambodia.
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Asclepius 
Latinized form of Greek Asklepios, which is of unknown origin. Beekes writes that "The name is typical for Pre-Greek words ...." Originally a Thessalian prince famous as a physician, later regarded as a son of Apollo and god of medicine.
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expectorant (n.)

in medicine, "a drug which promotes or facilitates phlegm or other such matter from the body by means of expectoration," 1782, from Latin expectorantem (nominative expectorans), present participle of expectorare (see expectorate). From 1811 as an adjective.

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