Etymology
Advertisement
angioma (n.)
"tumor produced by enlargement or new formation of blood vessels," 1867, medical Latin, from angio- + -oma. Related: Angiomatous.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
cavitation (n.)

"formation of bubbles in fluid," 1895, from cavity + -ation. Earlier as a medical term, "formation of cavities in the body" (1868).

Related entries & more 
pancreatitis (n.)

"inflammation of the pancreas," 1824 (Dr. George Pearson Dawson), medical Latin, from combining form of pancreas + -itis "inflammation." Related: Pancreatitic.

Related entries & more 
nyctophobia (n.)

"fear of the night or darkness," 1885, medical Latin, from nycto-, variant of nycti- "night, darkness" + -phobia "fear." Related: Nyctophobic.

Related entries & more 
symptomatology (n.)
study of symptoms, 1737, from medical Latin symptomatologia, from symptomat-, stem of symptoma (see symptom) + -logia (see -logy). Related: Symptomatological.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
tenesmus (n.)
"a straining" (to void the contents of the bowels), 1520s, medical Latin, from Greek tenesmos "a straining," from teinein "to stretch," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch."
Related entries & more 
side effect (n.)
also side-effect, 1884, from side (adj.) + effect (n.). Medical use, with reference to drugs, is recorded from 1939.
Related entries & more 
pre-existing (adj.)
also preexisting, 1590s, present-participle adjective from pre-exist. The medical insurance pre-existing condition is attested from 1942.
Related entries & more 
hypotonia (n.)
1876, medical Latin, from hypo- + Greek tonos "tone" (from PIE root *ten- "to stretch") + abstract noun ending -ia.
Related entries & more 
pediatrics (n.)

"medical treatment of children; the branch of medicine dealing with the study of childhood and diseases of children," 1884; from pediatric; see -ics.

Related entries & more 

Page 7