Etymology
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Maori (n.)

"Polynesian inhabitant of New Zealand," 1843, native name, said to mean "normal, natural, ordinary, of the usual kind." As an adjective by 1849.

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hindermost (adj.)

late 14c., hyndermest; see hinder (adj.) + -most. Middle English had also hindermore, which, as a noun, could mean "the hinder parts."

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Meiji 

"period of rule of emperor Mutsuhito" (1868-1912), which was marked by modernization and Westernization, 1873, from Japanese, said to mean literally "enlightened government."

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spirited (adj.)
"lively, energetic," 1590s, from spirit (v.) in its older sense. Milton uses it to mean "possessed by a spirit." Related: Spiritedly; spiritedness.
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whoreson (n.)
c. 1300, from whore (n.) + son. Often used affectionately, it translates Anglo-French fiz a putain. As an adjective, "mean, scurvy, contemptuous," from mid-15c.
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hull (v.)
"to remove the husk of," early 15c., from hull (n.1). Related: Hulled, which can mean both "having a particular kind of hull" and "stripped of the hull."
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codger (n.)

1756, "old man, odd person;" 1796, "mean, miserly man;" probably a variant of cadger "beggar" (see cadge (v.)), which is of unknown origin.

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yang (n.)
masculine or positive principle in Chinese philosophy, 1670s, from Mandarin yang, said to mean "male, daylight, solar," or "sun, positive, male genitals."
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Zanzibar 
island off East Africa, from Zengi, name of a local people, said to mean "black," + Arabic barr "coast, shore." Related: Zanzibari.
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leave-taking (n.)
late 14c., from the verbal phrase to take leave, originally "obtain or receive formal permission" in any sense (c. 1300); see take (v.) + leave (n.). Sense evolution was through "receive formal permission to depart;" by 16c. it had begun to mean "depart with an expression of farewell," and in some cases came to mean the farewell itself. Give (someone) leave (v.) "allow, permit" is from 12c.
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