Etymology
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warhead (n.)
also war-head, 1898, "explosive part of a torpedo," from war (n.) + head (n.). Later transferred to any missile (1944).
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warlord (n.)
also war-lord, 1856, from war (n.) + lord (n.). Often a translation of German Kriegsherr or Chinese junfa.
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polemic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to controversy," 1640s, from French polémique "disputatious, controversial," or directly from Greek polemikos "of war, warlike, belligerent; skilled in war, fit for service; like an enemy, stirring up hostility," from polemos "war," a word of unknown origin. Related: Polemical (1630s); polemically.

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quarter-deck (n.)

1620s, "the part of the spar-deck of a man-of-war between the poop and the main-mast," originally "a smaller deck above the half-deck," covering about a quarter of the vessel [OED], from quarter (n.1).

"It is used as a promenade by the officers only" [Century Dictionary], hence the colloquial nautical noun quarter-decker (by 1867) "an officer who is more looked upon as a stickler for small points of etiquette than as a thorough seaman."

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casus belli (n.)

an act justifying war, 1840, from Latin casus "case" (see case (n.1)) + belli, genitive of bellum "war" (see bellicose).

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misandry (n.)

"hatred of males," 1878, from miso- "hatred" + andros "of man, male," genitive of anēr "man" (from PIE root *ner- (2) "man"). Related: Misandrist.

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manservant (n.)

also man-servant, "a man who is a servant," late 14c., from man (n.) + servant.

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drayman (n.)

"man who drives and manages a dray," 1580s, from dray + man (n.).

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Truman 
surname, attested by 1215, literally "faithful man, trusty man."
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liner (n.1)
"vessel belonging to a shipping line," 1838, from line (n.) on notion of a succession of ships plying between ports along regular "lines," as distinguished from transient ships using those ports. (Line in this sense is attested by 1786 in reference to stagecoaches.) Earlier it meant "man of war, ship of the line" (1829). Meaning "cosmetic for highlighting the eyes" is from 1926. The type of baseball hit (forcible and parallel to the ground) was so called from 1874 (line drive is attested from 1899).
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