Etymology
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bookkeeper (n.)
also book-keeper, "person who keeps accounts, one whose occupation is to make a formal balanced record of pecuniary transactions in account-books," 1550s, from book (n.) + keeper. A rare English word with three consecutive double letters. Related: Bookkeeping, which is from 1680s in the sense "the work of keeping account books;" book-keep (v.) is a back-formation from 1886.
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ironwork (n.)
also iron-work, "objects made of iron," early 15c., from iron (n.) + work (n.). Related: Iron-worker (15c.). Iron works "iron foundry" is from 1580s.
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operant (adj.)

"that works, working, engaged in action," early 15c., from Latin operantem (nominative operans), present participle of operari "to work, labor" (in Late Latin "to have effect, be active, cause"), from opera "work, effort," related to opus (genitive operis) "a work" (from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance"). Psychological sense of "involving behavior modification" coined 1937 by U.S. psychologist B.F. Skinner (as in operant conditioning, 1938, Skinner).

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contractor (n.)

1540s, "one who enters into a contract," from Late Latin contractor "one who makes a contract," agent noun from past-participle stem of Latin contrahere "to draw several objects together; draw in, shorten, lessen, abridge," metaphorically "make a bargain, make an agreement," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + trahere "to draw" (see tract (n.1)).

From 1680s as "a muscle which contracts a part." Specifically "one who enters into a contract to provide work, services, or goods at a certain price or rate" is from 1724.

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tinker (v.)
1590s, "to work as a tinker," from tinker (n.). Meaning "work imperfectly, keep busy in a useless way," is first found 1650s. Related: Tinkered; tinkering.
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*werg- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to do."

It forms all or part of: allergic; allergy; argon; boulevard; bulwark; cholinergic; demiurge; dramaturge; energy; erg (n.1) "unit of energy;" ergative; ergonomics; ergophobia; George; georgic; handiwork; irk; lethargic; lethargy; liturgy; metallurgy; organ; organelle; organic; organism; organize; orgy; surgeon; surgery; synergism; synergy; thaumaturge; work; wright; wrought; zymurgy.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek ergon "work," orgia "religious performances;" Armenian gorc "work;" Avestan vareza "work, activity;" Gothic waurkjan, Old English wyrcan "to work," Old English weorc "deed, action, something done;" Old Norse yrka "work, take effect."
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patchwork (n.)

1690s, "work composed of ill-sorted parts clumsily put together;" 1720s (though perhaps the older sense) "work composed of pieces of various colors or figures sewed together;" from patch (n.1) + work (n.). As an adjective, "made up of odds and ends," from 1713.

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graveyard (n.)
1683, from grave (n.) + yard (n.1). Graveyard shift "late-night work" is c. 1907, from earlier nautical term, in reference to the loneliness of after-hours work.
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inure (v.)
formerly also enure, mid-15c., "accustom, adapt, establish by use," contracted from phrase (put) in ure "in practice" (early 15c.), from obsolete noun ure "work, practice, exercise, use," probably from Old French uevre, oeuvre "work," from Latin opera "work" (from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance"). Meaning "toughen or harden by experience" is from late 15c. Related: Inured; inuring.
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