Etymology
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Fiji 
of uncertain origin, considered in Room to be probably a variant of Viti, main island of the group.
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cross-hair (n.)

also crosshair, cross-hairs, "very fine line (originally spider's silk) stretched across the focal plane of a telescope or microscope, forming a cross with another," 1755 of a telescope, 1780 in gunnery, from cross- + hair (n.). Also often in early 19c. spider-line, spider's-line (1819).

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borderline (n.)

also border-line, 1847, "strip of land along a frontier," from border (n.) + line (n.). As an adjective meaning "verging on" it is attested from 1903, originally in medical jargon.

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lined (adj.)
"having a lining or backing" (of some other material), mid-15c., from past participle of line (v.1); meaning "marked with lines" is from 1776, from past participle of line (v.2).
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diagonal (adj.)

early 15c. (implied in diagonally), "extending as a line from one angle to another not adjacent," from Old French diagonal, from Latin diagonalis, from diagonus "slanting line," from Greek diagonios "from angle to angle," from dia "across, through" (see dia-) + gōnia "angle, corner" (from PIE root *genu- (1) "knee; angle").

As a noun, from 1570s, "straight line drawn from one angle to or through another not adjacent, in a plane or solid figure." In chess, "a line of squares running diagonally across a board."

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hemistich (n.)

"half a poetic line," 1570s, from French hémistiche (16c.) or directly from Late Latin hemistichium, from Greek hēmistikhion "half-line, half-verse," from hēmi- "half" (see hemi-) + stikhos "row, line of verse," from PIE *stigho-, suffixed form of root *steigh- "to stride, step, rise" (see stair). Related: Hemistichal.

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sadly (adv.)

c. 1300, "heavily," also "solidly," from sad + -ly (2). The main modern meaning "sorrowfully" begins by mid-14c.

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frankfurter (n.)
"hot dog," 1894, American English, from German Frankfurter (wurst) "(sausage) of Frankfurt," so called because the U.S. product resembled a type of smoked-beef-and-pork sausage originally made in Germany, where it was associated with the city of Frankfurt am Main (literally "ford of the Franks" on the River Main). Attested from 1877 as Frankfort sausage.
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raj (n.)

"British rule in India," 1859, from Hindi raj "rule, dominion, kingdom" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line," with derivatives meaning "to direct in a straight line," thus "to lead, rule").

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