Etymology
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breather (n.)
c. 1600, "a living creature, one who breathes," agent noun from breathe. Meaning "spell of exercise to stimulate breathing" is from 1836; that of "a rest to recover breath" is from 1882.
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inlaid (adj.)
1590s, "embedded in (something)," from in + laid, past participle of lay (v.). In old slang (c. 1700) it meant "full of money, living at ease."
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microbe (n.)

popular name for a bacterium or other extremely small living being, 1878, from French microbe, "badly coined ... by Sédillot" [Weekley] in 1878 from Latinized form of Greek mikros "small" (see micro-) + bios "life" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live"). Intended to mean literally "a small living being," the use of bios is incorrect, as in modern science generally (see bio-); in Greek the compound would mean "short-lived."

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parasitism (n.)

"a habitual living on or at the expense of another," 1610s, from parasite + -ism. Biological sense of "vital relation of a parasite to a host" is by 1840.

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industrialist (n.)
1846, from industrial + -ist. Perhaps modeled on French industrialiste (Saint-Simon, 1823). Earlier "one who makes a living by productive industry" (1837).
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sanguicolous (adj.)

"living in the blood" (as a parasite does), by 1889, from Latin sanguis "blood" (see sanguinary) + colere "to inhabit" (see colony). Also, with classical stem, sanguinicolous.

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-plast 
word-forming element denoting "something made," from Greek plastos "formed, molded," verbal adjective from plassein "to mold" (see plasma). Used to form names of small particles of living matter.
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physiological (adj.)

c. 1600, "of or pertaining to natural science" (a sense now obsolete), from physiology + -ical. From 1814 as "of or pertaining to physiology, relating to the functions and properties of living bodies." Related: Physiologically.

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Indic (adj.)
"pertaining to India or its inhabitants," 1877, from Latin Indicus "of India," or Greek Indikos "of India;" see India. Especially in reference to the Indo-European languages of India, living and dead.
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arboreal (adj.)
1660s, "pertaining to trees," from Latin arboreus "pertaining to trees," from arbor, arboris "tree" (see arbor (n.2)) + -al (1). From 1834 as "living in or among trees."
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