Etymology
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victuals (n.)

c. 1300, vitaylle (singular), from Anglo-French and Old French vitaille "food, nourishment, provisions," from Late Latin victualia "provisions," noun use of plural of victualis "of nourishment," from victus "livelihood, food, sustenance, that which sustains life," from past participle stem of vivere "to live" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live"). Spelling altered early 16c. to conform with Latin, but pronunciation remains "vittles."

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Galapagos 

islands were named for the tortoises (Spanish galapagos) who live there; discovered by Europeans in 1535. Related: Galapagian.

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zoon (n.)

"animal form containing all elements of a typical organism of its group," 1864, from Greek zōon "animal," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."

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long-lived (adj.)

"having long life," c. 1400, from long (adv.) + past participle of live (v.). Old English had langlife "long-lived."

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habitable (adj.)

"capable of being inhabited or dwelt in; suited to serve as an abode for human beings," late 14c., from Old French habitable "suitable for human dwelling" (14c.), from Latin habitabilis "that is fit to live in," from habitare "to live, inhabit, dwell," frequentative of habere "to have, to hold, possess" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive").

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revive (v.)

early 15c., reviven, "regain consciousness; recover health," also transitive, "restore (someone) to health, revive (someone or something)," from Old French revivre (10c.) and directly from Latin revivere "to live again," from re- "again" (see re-) + vivere "to live" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live").

The meaning "bring back to use or notice" is from mid-15c.; as "put an old play on stage again after a lapse of time" by 1823. The intransitive sense of "return to a flourishing state" is by 1560s. Of feelings, activities, "begin to occur again" (intransitive), mid-15c. Related: Revived; reviving.

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tassel (n.)

c. 1300, "mantle fastener," from Old French tassel "tassel, fringe, hem; a fastening, clasp" (12c., Modern French tasseau), from Vulgar Latin *tassellus, said to be from Latin taxillus "small die or cube," a diminutive of talus "knucklebone (used as a die in gaming), ankle" (see talus (n.1)). But OED finds this doubtful and calls attention to the variant form tossel and suggests association with toss (v.). Meaning "hanging bunch of small cords" is first recorded late 14c.

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fey (adj.)

"of excitement that presages death," from Old English fæge "doomed to die, fated, destined," also "timid, feeble;" and/or from Old Norse feigr, both from Proto-Germanic *faigjo- (source also of Old Saxon fegi, Old Frisian fai, Middle Dutch vege, Middle High German veige "doomed," also "timid," German feige "cowardly"), from the same source as foe. Preserved in Scottish. Sense of "displaying unearthly qualities" and "disordered in the mind (like one about to die)" led to modern ironic sense of "affected."

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dye (v.)

"fix a color or colors in the substance of by immersion in coloring matter held in solution," Middle English deien, Old English deagian "to dye," from the source of dye (n.). Spelling distinction between dye and die was not firm till 19c. "Johnson in his Dictionary, spelled them both die, while Addison, his near contemporary, spelled both dye" [Barnhart]. Related: dyed. For dyed in the wool (or grain) see wool (n.).

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anthracomancy (n.)

"divination by inspection of burning coals," 1895, from Latinized combining form of Greek anthrax "live coal" (see anthrax) + -mancy "divination by means of."

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