Etymology
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cadaverous (adj.)

early 15c., "gangrenous, mortified;" 1620s "of or belonging to a corpse;" 1660s, "looking like a corpse;" from Latin cadaverosus "corpse-like," from cadaver "dead body" (see cadaver). Related: Cadaverously; cadaverousness.

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pillbug (n.)

also pill-bug, kind of wood-louse or other insect-like crustacean which can roll itself into a ball like a pill, 1841, from pill (n.) + bug (n.).

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homey (adj.)

"home-like," variant spelling of homy (q.v.).

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Nematoda 

a class of worms, usually parasitic, irregular Modern Latin compound of Greek nemat- "thread" (see nemato-) + -odes "like, of the nature of" (see -oid). So called for their thread-like appearance.

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demagogic (adj.)

"relating to or like a demagogue, given to pandering to the rabble from self-interest," 1794; see demagogue + -ic. Greek had demagogikos "fit for or like a demagogue." Related: Demagogical (1734).

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tangelo (n.)

"hybrid of a tangerine and a pomelo," 1904, the word formed like the fruit.

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damnation (n.)

c. 1300, dampnacioun, "condemnation to Hell by God," also "fact of being condemned by judicial sentence," from Old French damnation, from Latin damnationem (nominative damnatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of damnare "to doom, condemn" (see damn). As an imprecation, attested from c. 1600.

Damnation follows death in other men,
But your damn'd Poet lives and writes agen.
[Pope, letter to Henry Cromwell, 1707 or 1708]
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warry (adj.)

"war-like," 1901, from war (n.) + -y (2).

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prion (n.)

petrel-like bird, 1848, from the Modern Latin name in zoology (1799), from Greek priōn "a saw," related to priein, prizein "to saw, to be cut in pieces," which is of uncertain etymology. So called for its saw-like bill.

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-form 

word-forming element meaning "-like, -shaped, in the form of," from French -forme and directly from Latin -formis "-like, shaped," from forma "form" (see form (n.)). Properly preceded by an -i-.

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