Etymology
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bivalence (n.)
"state or quality of being bivalent," 1868; see bivalent + -ence. Bivalency is from 1872. Divalence is said to be the preferred later word.
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pop-up (n.)
from 1906 as a type of baseball hit; from pop (v.) + up (adv.). As an adjective from 1934 (of a children's book, later toasters, etc.).
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justiciary (n.)
"administrator of justice," 1540s; later as an adjective, "pertaining to the law" (1580s), from Medieval Latin justiciarius, from Latin iustitia (see justice (n.)).
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Anubis 
jackal-headed god of Egyptian religion, identified by the later Greeks with their Hermes, from Greek Anoubis, from Egyptian Anpu, Anepu.
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sith (adv., conj., prep.)
"since" (obsolete), Middle English, reduced from Old English siððan "then, thereupon; continuously, during which; seeing that," from *sið þon "subsequent to that," from sið "after," from Proto-Germanic *sith- "later, after" (source also of Old Saxon sith "after that, since, later," German seit "since," Gothic seiþus "late"), from PIE *se- (2) "long, late" (see soiree).
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cybercafe (n.)

"cafe that offers Internet access on its computers," or (later) via Wi-Fi on customers' computers," 1994, from cyber- + cafe.

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Hyperion 
a Titan, son of Uranus and Gaea, later identified with Apollo, from Greek, literally "he who looks from above," from hyper "over, beyond" (see hyper-).
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sapphirine (adj.)

early 15c., "sapphire-colored," later also "made of sapphire, having the qualities of sapphire," from Latin sapphirinus, from Greek sappheirinos, from sappheiros (see sapphire (n.)).

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cannibalistic (adj.)
"characterized by cannibalism," 1840, from cannibal + -istic. Elder, but swallowed up by the later word, were cannibalic, cannibalish (both from 1824), cannibalean (c. 1600).
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payer (n.)

late 14c., "person who pays," originally wages, later taxes (early 15c.), from Old French paiere (13c.), agent noun from paier (see pay (v.)).

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