Etymology
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Mitty 

also Walter Mitty, in reference to an adventurous daydreamer, by 1950, from title character in "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," short story by U.S. author James Thurber (1894-1961) first published in the New Yorker March 18, 1939.

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bowie knife (n.)

"heavy-single-edged sheath-knife used early 19c. on the U.S. frontier," 1827, named for its inventor, U.S. fighter and frontiersman Col. James "Jim" Bowie (1799-1836), and properly pronounced "boo-ee."

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generalissimo (n.)

"supreme military commander," 1620s, from Italian generalissimo, superlative of generale, from a sense development similar to French general (see general (n.)). Parson Weems applied it to George Washington. In 20c. use sometimes from Spanish generalísimo in reference to the military dictator Franco.

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fluorescence (n.)

1852, "property of glowing in ultraviolet light," coined by English mathematician and physicist Sir George G. Stokes (1819-1903) from fluorspar (see fluorine), because in it he first noticed the phenomenon, + -escence, on analogy of phosphorescence.

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outcry (n.)

mid-14c., "act of crying aloud, a loud or vehement clamor," especially of indignation or distress, from out (adv.) + cry (v.). In metaphoric sense of "public protest," it is attested by 1911 in George Bernard Shaw.

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Bunker Hill 

battle site in Massachusetts, U.S., it rises on land assigned in 1634 to George Bunker, who came from the vicinity of Bedford, England. The name dates from 1229, as Bonquer, and is from Old French bon quer "good heart."

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Vancouver 

Canadian city, settled 1865, named for the island, which was named for English navigator George Vancouver (1757-1798) who sailed with Capt. Cook and surveyed the Pacific coast in this area in 1792.

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Velox (n.)

type of photographic print paper made by a process patented 1893 by Leo Baekeland, who sold it to George Eastman in 1899 for $1 million and used the money to build the laboratory where he made great discoveries in plastics (see Bakelite).

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cephalization (n.)

"tendency of animal species to evolve so as to have important parts near the head," 1864, coined by U.S. zoologist and geologist James Dwight Dana (1813-1895) from Latinized form of Greek kephalē "head" (see cephalo-) on model of specialization, etc. Related: Cephalize.

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Georgia 

the U.S. state was named 1732 as a colony for King George II of Great Britain. The Caucasian nation is so-called for St. George, who is its patron saint (his cult there may continue that of a pre-Christian deity with whom he later was identified), but the name in that place also is said to derive from Arabic or Persian Kurj, or Gurz (the form in the earliest sources, Russian Grusia), which is said to be a name of the native people, of unknown origin. In modern Georgia, the name of the country is Sakartvelo and the people's name is Kartveli. Georgia pine, long-leafed pine of the Southern U.S. states, is from 1796.

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