Etymology
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replicate (adj.)

1832, in botany, of a leaf, "folded back upon itself; folded so as to form a groove," from Latin replicatus, past participle of replicare "to fold back, fold over" (see replicate (v.)).

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Abaddon 

late 14c., used in Revelation ix.11 of "the angel of the bottomless pit," and by Milton of the pit itself, from Hebrew Abhaddon, literally "destruction," from abhadh "he perished." The Greek form was Apollyon.

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zipper (n.)
1925, probably an agent noun from zip (v.1). The trademark taken out on the name that year applied to a boot with zippers, not to the "lightning fastener" itself, which was so called by 1927.
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oneself 

1540s, one's self, "a person's self" (without distinction of gender), an emphatic form of one, with self. Hyphenated 18c.; written as one word from c. 1827, on model of himself, herself, myself, itself, etc.

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Ritalin (n.)

central nervous system stimulant, a proprietary name (Ciba Ltd., originally in Switzerland) for the drug methylphenidate hydrochloride. It was trademarked 1948, years before the drug itself was marketed.

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labour 
chiefly British English spelling of labor (q.v.); for spelling, see -or. With capital L-, short for "the British Labour Party," it is attested from 1892; the party name itself is from 1886.
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Proto-Indo-European (n.)

the hypothetical reconstructed ancestral language of the Indo-European family, by 1905. The time scale of the "language" itself is much debated, but a recent date proposed for it is about 5,500 years ago. 

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faux (adj.)
from French faux "false" (12c., see false). Used with English words at least since 1676 (Etheredge, faux-prude). Used by itself, with French pronunciation, from 1980s to mean "fake."
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clasp-knife (n.)

"knife with one or more blades which fold into the handle," 1743, from clasp (n.) + knife (n.). The thing itself was known to the Etruscans and Romans; it became popular again 17c. 

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superpower (n.)
1944, in geopolitical sense of "nation with great interest and ability to exert force in worldwide theaters of conflict," from super- + power (n.). The word itself is attested in physical (electrical power) senses from 1922.
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