Etymology
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sol-fa (n.)
"syllables used in solmization taken collectively," 1540s, from Italian, from Medieval Latin sol and fa, two notes of the musical scale (see gamut). As a verb from 1560s; compare solfeggio "use the sol-fa system" (1774), from Italian solfeggiare.
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entablature (n.)
1610s, in architecture, nativization of Italian intavolatura; see en- (1) + tablature.
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pastiche (n.)
"a medley made up of fragments from different works," 1878, from French pastiche (18c.), from Italian pasticcio "medley, pastry cake," from Vulgar Latin *pasticium "composed of paste," from Late Latin pasta "paste, pastry cake" (see pasta). Borrowed earlier (1752) in the Italian form.
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Romano 
strong-tasting hard cheese, 1908, from Italian, literally "Roman" (see Roman).
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sorbet (n.)
1580s, "cooling drink of fruit juice and water," from French sorbet (16c.), probably from Italian sorbetto, from Turkish serbet (see sherbet). Perhaps influenced in form by Italian sorbire "to sip." Meaning "semi-liquid water ice as a dessert" first recorded 1864.
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lasagna (n.)
"pasta cut in long, wide strips; a dish made from this," 1760 (as an Italian word in English), from Italian (plural is lasagne), from Vulgar Latin *lasania, from Latin lasanum "a cooking pot," from Greek lasanon "pot with feet, trivet." Sometimes nativized as lasagne.
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mandragora (n.)

older and unaltered form of mandrake (q.v.). It corresponds to the Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese forms.

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minestrone (n.)
Italian vegetable soup, 1871, from Italian minestrone, with augmentative suffix -one + minestra "soup, pottage," literally "that which is served," from minestrare "to serve, to prepare (soup, etc.)," from Latin ministrare "to serve, attend, wait upon," from minister "inferior, servant, priest's assistant" (see minister (n.)).
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al fresco (adv.)
also alfresco, 1753, Italian, literally "in the fresh (air)." Italian al represents a contraction of words from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + ille "that" (see le). Alfresco also meant "painted on plaster that was still fresh or moist" (1764; see fresco).
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fascist (adj.)
Origin and meaning of fascist

1921, from Italian partito nazionale fascista, the anti-communist political movement organized 1919 under Benito Mussolini (1883-1945); from Italian fascio "group, association," literally "bundle," from Latin fasces (see fasces).

Fasci "groups of men organized for political purposes" had been a feature of Sicily since c. 1895, and the 20c. totalitarian sense probably came directly from this but was influenced by the historical Roman fasces, which became the party symbol. As a noun from 1922 in English, earlier in Italian plural fascisti (1921), and until 1923 in English it often appeared in its Italian form, as an Italian word.

[Fowler: "Whether this full anglicization of the words is worth while cannot be decided till we know whether the things are to be temporary or permanent in England" -- probably an addition to the 1930 reprint, retained in 1944 U.S. edition.] Related: Fascistic.

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