Etymology
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pendency (n.)

1630s, "state of being undecided or in continuance," from pendent + abstract noun suffix -cy. The more literal sense of "state of being suspended" (1770) is rare. Related: Pendence (1620s).

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temper (n.)
late 14c., "due proportion of elements or qualities," from temper (v.). The sense of "characteristic state of mind, inclination, disposition" is first recorded 1590s; that of "calm state of mind, tranquility" in c. 1600; and that of "angry state of mind" (for bad temper) in 1828. Meaning "degree of hardness and resiliency in steel" is from late 15c.
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parastate (n.)

also para-state, "institution or body which takes on some of the roles of civil government," 1959, from para- (1) "beside" + state (n.). Related: Parastatal.

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craziness (n.)

c. 1600, "infirmity, state of being broken down," from crazy + -ness. Oldest sense is now obsolete. The meaning "state of being flawed or damaged" is from 1660s; that of "mental unsoundness" is from 1755.

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overstate (v.)

1630s, "assume too much grandeur;" see over- + state (n.1). Meaning "exaggerate in statement, declare too strongly" is attested from 1798, from state (v.). Related: Overstated, overstating.

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stateroom (n.)
also state-room, 1703, room reserved for ceremonial occasions; earlier (1650s) "a captain's cabin;" from room (n.) + state (n.1) in a sense also preserved in stately.
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messy (adj.)

1843, "untidy, in a state of disorder or dirtiness," from mess (n.) "state of confusion" + -y (2). Figurative use ("unethical") is attested by 1924. Related: Messily; messiness.

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emptiness (n.)

"the state of containing nothing," 1530s, from empty + -ness.

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toxicity (n.)
"state of being toxic," 1880, from toxic + -ity.
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