Etymology
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coquettish (adj.)

"resembling a coquette, characterized by coquetry," 1702, from coquette + -ish. Related: Coquettishly.

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Romish (adj.)

"Roman-Catholic," 1530s, "commonly used in a slightly invidious sense" [Century Dictionary], from Rome + -ish.

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shrewish (adj.)
late 14c., "wicked, malignant," from shrew + -ish. Of women, "malignant and scolding," from 1560s. Related: Shrewishly; shrewishness.
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snobbish (adj.)
1840, "pertaining to snobs," from snob + -ish. Meaning "with the character of a snob" is from 1849. Related: Snobbishly; snobbishness.
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dwarfish (adj.)

"below the common stature or size," 1560s, from dwarf (n.) + -ish. Related: Dwarfishly; dwarfishness.

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popish (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the Pope or the Roman Catholic Church," 1520s, a hostile coinage from Pope + -ish.

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puckish (adj.)

"resembling the fairy Puck; merry and mischievous; like what Puck might do," 1867, from Puck + -ish. Related: Puckishly; puckishness.

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uppish (adj.)
1670s, "lavish," from up (adv.) + -ish. Sense of "conceited, arrogant, proudly self-assertive" attested from 1734. Related: Uppishly; uppishness.
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mulish (adj.)

"having the characteristics imputed to the mule," especially "stubborn," 1751, from mule (n.1) + -ish. Related: Mulishly; mulishness.

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hawkish (adj.)
"hawk-like," by 1703, from hawk (n.) + -ish. Sense of "militaristic" is from 1965, from hawk in the transferred sense.
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