Etymology
Advertisement
relapse (n.)

mid-15c., "a falling back into error or wrongdoing, moral backsliding," from relapse (v.) or else from Medieval Latin relapsus. In medicine, "a falling back into a disease or symptom during or after convalescence," from 1580s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
orbiter (n.)

"spacecraft intended to go into orbit," 1954, agent noun from orbit (v.).

Related entries & more 
affiliate (adj.)

"taken into close association," 1858, from affiliate (v.).

Related entries & more 
pellet (v.)

"to form into little balls," 1590s, from pellet (n.).

Related entries & more 
inspect (v.)

1620s, from Latin inspectus, past participle of inspicere "look at, observe, view; look into, inspect, examine," from in- "into" (from PIE root *en "in") + specere "to look" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Related: Inspected; inspecting.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
canton (v.)

1590s, "divide into districts," from canton (n.). Related: Cantoned.

Related entries & more 
expediate (v.)

a 17c. error for expedite that has gotten into the dictionaries.

Related entries & more 
united (adj.)

"made into one," 1550s, past-participle adjective from unite (v.).

Related entries & more 
investigable (adj.)

"that may be investigated," c. 1400, from Late Latin investigabilis "that may be searched into," from Latin investigare "trace out, search after," from in- "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + vestigare "to track, trace," from vestigium "footprint, track" (see vestige).

Related entries & more 
interflow (n.)

"a flowing into each other," 1839, from inter- + flow (n.).

Related entries & more 

Page 7