Etymology
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strum (v.)

1775, possibly imitative of the sound of running the fingers across the strings of a musical instrument. Related: Strummed; strumming. As a noun from 1793.

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logograph (n.)

"instrument for giving a graphic representation of speech, word-writer," 1879, from logo- "word" + -graph "instrument for recording; something written." Earliest use (1797) is in the sense "logogriph," and it frequently was used in place of that word (see logogriph). In ancient Greek, logographos was "prose-writer, chronicler, speech-writer." Related: Logographic.

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picklock (n.)

1550s, "person who picks locks;" 1590s, "instrument for picking and opening a lock;" from pick (v.) + lock (n.1).

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gravimeter (n.)

"instrument for measuring the forces of gravity," 1797, from French gravimètre, from gravité (see gravity) + -mètre "measuring device" (see -meter).

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hydraulic (adj.)

"pertaining to fluids in motion," c. 1600, from French hydraulique, from Latin hydraulicus, from Greek hydraulikos (organon) "water organ," the name of a musical instrument invented by the Egyptian Ctesibius, from hydr-, stem of hydor "water" (from suffixed form of PIE root *wed- (1) "water; wet") + aulos "musical instrument, hollow tube, pipe" (see alveolus). Extended by the Romans to other water engines.

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samisen (n.)

Japanese three-stringed banjo-like instrument, 1610s, from Chinese san-hsien, literally "three-strings," from san "three" + hsien "string."

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torment (v.)

c. 1300, "inflict torture on, distress," from Old French tormenter "torture, torment, oppress, agitate" (12c.), from Medieval Latin tormentare "to torment, to twist," from Latin tormentum "twisted cord, sling; clothes-press; instrument for hurling stones," also "instrument of torture, a rack," figuratively "anguish, pain, torment," from torquere "to twist" (from PIE root *terkw- "to twist"). Related: Tormented; tormenting.

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synthesizer (v.)

1869, agent noun from synthesize. As a type of instrument for generating musical or vocal sounds from 1909; the electronic version is from 1950s.

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eye-piece (n.)

also eyepiece, "the lens or combination of lenses to which the eye is applied in an optical instrument," 1738, from eye (n.) + piece (n.1).

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hygrometer (n.)

"instrument for measuring atmospheric moisture," 1660s, from French hygromètre, from Greek hygro- "wet, moist; moisture" (see hygro-) + -meter. Related: Hygrometry; hygrometric.

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