Etymology
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off-rhyme (n.)

"partial or near rhyme," 1938, from off (prep.) + rhyme (n.).

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send-off (n.)

"a farewell" (especially a funeral), 1872 ("Mark Twain"), from the verbal phrase send off "cause to be sent" (attested by 1660s), from send (v.) + off (adv.). Earlier a send-off was "a start," as on a journey or race (1841), hence "a display of good-will on the occasion of such."

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set off (v.)

verbal phrase; see set (v.) + off (adv.). From 1590s as "make prominent by contrast," 1610s as "adorn." Intransitive sense of "start on or as on a journey" is from 1774. Meaning "separate from contect" (in typography) is from 1824; sense of "ignite, discharge, cause to explode" is from 1810.

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flashy (adj.)
"showy, cheaply attractive," 1680s, from flash (n.1) + -y (2). Earlier it meant "splashing" (1580s); "sparkling, giving off flashes" (c. 1600), but those senses have become rare. Related: Flashily; flashiness.
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buzz (v.)
late 15c. (buzzing is from late 14c.), echoic of bees and other insects. Aviation sense of "fly low and close" is by 1941 (see buzz (n.)). Related: Buzzed. To buzz off "go away quickly" (1914) originally meant "to ring off on the telephone," from the use of buzzers to signal a call or message on old systems. As a command, it originally would have been telling someone to get off the line.
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layoff (n.)
also lay-off, lay off; 1889, "rest, relaxation, respite;" from the verbal phrase; see lay (v.) + off (adv.). Via seasonal labor with periodic inactivity, it came to have a sense of "temporary release from employment," and by 1960s was being used somewhat euphemistically for permanent releases of masses of workers by employers. The verbal phrase lay off is attested from 1841 (colloquial) as "stop working, be idle" (intransitive); 1892 as "dismiss" (an employee); meaning "stop disturbing" is from 1908. Its oldest sense is "remove and lay aside, rid oneself of" (1590s).
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parry (v.)

1630s, "to turn aside or ward off" the blow of a weapon (transitive), from French parez! (a word which would have been heard often in fencing lessons), imperative of parer "ward off," from Italian parare "to ward or defend (a blow)" (see para- (2)). Related: Parried; parrying. Non-fencing use is from 1718. The noun, "an act of warding off or turning aside," is by 1705, from the verb.

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knockoff (n.)
also knock-off, "cheap imitation," 1966, from the verbal phrase knock off "do hastily" (1817), in reference to the casual way the things are made. The verbal phrase knock off is attested from 1640s as "desist, stop" (work, study, etc.), hence knockoff (n.) "act of leaving work" (1899) and, probably, the command knock it off "stop it" (1880), which was perhaps reinforced by the auctioneer's use of the term for "dispose of quickly." To knock (someone) off in the underworld slang sense of "kill, murder" is from 1919. See knock (v.) + off (adv.).
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gonoph (n.)
also gonof, "thief, pickpocket," London slang, 1852, said to have been introduced by German Jews, from Hebrew gannabh "thief," with form altered in English as if from gone off.
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deciduous (adj.)

1680s, with reference to leaves, petals, teeth, etc., "falling off at a certain stage of existence," from Latin deciduus "that which falls down," from decidere "to fall off, fall down," from de "down" (see de-) + combining form of cadere "to fall," from PIE root *kad- "to fall." Of trees and bushes, "losing foliage every year" (opposed to evergreen), from 1778. The Latin adjective was used of shooting stars and testicles, but it seems not to have been used of trees or leaves (the phenomenon in Italy seems to be restricted to the mountain regions). Related: Deciduousness.

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