Etymology
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*ei- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to go."

It forms all or part of: Abitur; adit; ambience; ambient; ambit; ambition; ambitious; andante; anion; cation; circuit; coitus; commence; commencement; concomitant; constable; count (n.1) title of nobility; county; dysprosium; errant; exit; initial; initiate; initiation; introit; ion; issue; itinerant; itinerary; janitor; January; Janus; Jena; Mahayana; obiter; obituary; perish; praetor; Praetorian; preterite; sedition; sudden; trance; transient; transit; transitive; viscount.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit e'ti "goes," imas "we go," ayanam "a going, way;" Avestan ae'iti "goes," Old Persian aitiy "goes;" Greek ienai "to go;" Latin ire "to go," iter "a way;" Old Irish ethaim "I go," Irish bothar "a road" (from *bou-itro- "cows' way"), Gaulish eimu "we go;" Lithuanian eiti "to go;" Old Church Slavonic iti "go;" Bulgarian ida "I go;" Russian idti "to go;" Gothic iddja "went."
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allons 
"well!" French, literally "let us go," first person plural imperative of aller "to go" (see alley (n.1)).
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exceed (v.)

late 14c., exceden, "to go beyond," from Old French exceder (14c.) "exceed, surpass, go too far," from Latin excedere "depart, go beyond, be in excess, surpass," from ex "out" (see ex-) + cedere "to go, yield" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Related: Exceeded; exceeding. Exceedingly (late 15c.) means "very greatly or very much;" excessively (mid-15c.) means "too greatly or too much."

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longeron (n.)
airplane part, 1912, from French longeron, from longer "to skirt, extend along," from allonger "to lengthen" (see lunge (n.)).
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Abitur (n.)
German final secondary school exam, 1863, short for abiturium, from Modern Latin abitorire "to wish to leave," desiderative of Latin abire (neuter plural abitum) "to go away," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go").
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ambitious (adj.)
late 14c., "craving, yearning, overambitious," from Latin ambitiosus "eager for public office, eager to win favor, ingratiating," from ambitio "a going around (to solicit votes)," noun of action from past participle stem of ambire "to go around, go about," from amb- "around" (from PIE root *ambhi- "around") + ire "go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). Meaning "springing from ambition" is from 1751. Related: Ambitiously; ambitiousness.
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skirt (v.)
c. 1600, "to border, form the edge of," from skirt (n.). Meaning "to pass along the edge" is from 1620s. Related: Skirted; skirting.
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cottonmouth (n.)

"venomous serpent of the U.S. South," 1849, so called for the white streak along its mouth; see cotton (n.) + mouth (n.).

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ridgeway (n.)

"road along a ridge or following the crest of downs," Old English hryc weg; see ridge (n.) + way (n.). Related: Ridgeways.

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Andes 

great mountain system along the Pacific coast of South America, from Quechua (Inca) andi "high crest." Related: Andean.

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