Etymology
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glossator (n.)
"writer of glosses," late 14c., from Medieval Latin glossator, from Latin glossa (see gloss (n.2)). Also in same sense were glosser (c. 1600), glossographer (c. 1600), glossist (1640s), glossarist (1774), glossographist (1774).
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byline (n.)
also by-line, 1926, "line giving the name of the writer of an article in a newspaper or magazine;" it typically reads BY ________. From by (prep.) + line (n.). As a verb by 1942. Related: Bylined.
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memoirs (n.)

"personal record of events, narrative of the facts or events of the life of a person or a phase of history written from personal knowledge or observation upon points about which the writer is specially informed," 1650s, plural of memoir.

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comic (n.)

1580s, "a comedic writer;" 1610s, "a comedic actor or singer," from comic (adj.). The Latin adjective comicus also meant "a comedic poet, writer of comedies." Meaning "an entertainer who tells jokes, etc." is by 1952.

Comics for comedic illustrations in cards, newspapers, etc. is from 1890. Comic strip first attested 1914; comic book "a publication that consists of comic art in the form of sequential juxtaposed panels that represent individual scenes" [Wikipedia] is from 1941 (the phrase was used from the 1880s to denote humorous books, some of which consisted entirely of captioned illustrations).

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grammarian (n.)
late 14c., "writer on (Latin) grammar; philologist, etymologist;" in general use, "learned man," from Old French gramairien "wise man, person who knows Latin; magician" (Modern French grammairien), agent noun from grammaire (see grammar).
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satiric (adj.)

"of, pertaining to, or of the nature of satire; containing or marked by satire," c. 1500, from French satirique, from Late Latin satiricus, from satira (see satire (n.)). Earlier (late 14c.) as a noun meaning "a writer of satires," translating Latin satiricus.

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haunt (n.)
c. 1300, "place frequently visited," also in Middle English, "a habit, custom" (early 14c.), from Old French hant "frequentation; place frequently visited," from hanter (see haunt (v.)). The meaning "spirit that haunts a place, ghost" is first recorded 1843, originally in stereotypical African-American vernacular, from the later meaning of the verb.
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rhetorician (n.)

early 15c., rethoricien, "writer on the art of rhetoric; professional orator; master of literary eloquence," from Old French rethoricien (Modern French rhétoricien), from rethorique (see rhetoric). An Old English word for one was wordsawere "word-sower."

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scholiast (n.)

"commentator, annotator," especially "an ancient grammarian who writes explanatory notes upon a classical writer," 1580s, from Late Latin scholiasta, from Late Greek skholiastēs, from skholiazein, from skholion "explanatory note or comment," from skholē (see school (n.1)). Related: Scholiastic.

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zorro (n.)
1838, "South American fox-wolf," from Spanish zorro, masc. of zorra "fox," from Basque azaria "fox." The comic book hero, a variation on the Robin Hood theme set in old Spanish California, was created 1919 by U.S. writer Johnston McCulley (1883-1958).
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