Etymology
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Jennifer 
fem. proper name, from Welsh Gwenhwyvar, from gwen "fair, white" + (g)wyf "smooth, yielding." The most popular name for girls born in America 1970-1984; all but unknown there before 1938. Also attested as a surname from late 13c.
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fluorescence (n.)
1852, "property of glowing in ultraviolet light," coined by English mathematician and physicist Sir George G. Stokes (1819-1903) from fluorspar (see fluorine), because in it he first noticed the phenomenon, + -escence, on analogy of phosphorescence.
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ablactation (n.)
Origin and meaning of ablactation

"weaning of a child," 1650s, from Latin ablactationem (nominative ablactatio) "weaning," noun of action from past-participle stem of ablactare "to wean," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + lactare "to suckle," from lac (genitive lactis) "milk" (from PIE root *g(a)lag- "milk").

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acclimatize (v.)

1824, "modify a living thing to suit a foreign climate" (transitive); see acclimate + -ize. A more recent formation than acclimate and generally replacing it in this sense. Related: Acclimatized; acclimatizing. Simple climatize is attested from 1826 as "inure (a living thing) to a climate."

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aneuploidy (n.)

abnormal number of chromosomes, 1934, from adjective aneuploid (1931), Modern Latin, coined 1922 by G. Täckholm from Greek an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + euploid, from Greek eu "well, good" (see eu-) + -ploid, from -ploos "fold" (from PIE root *pel- (2) "to fold").

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enharmonic (adj.)
c. 1600, in reference to Greek music, from Late Latin enharmonicus, from Greek enharmonikos, from en (see en- (2)) + harmonikos (see harmonic). From 1794 in reference to a modern music note that can be indicated in different ways (G sharp/A flat).
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prognostic (adj.)

"indicating something in the future by signs or symptoms," mid-15c., pronostik, c. 1600, from Medieval Latin pronosticus, prognosticus, from Greek prognōstikos "foreknowing," from progignōskein "come to know beforehand" (see prognosis). The -g- in the English word was restored 16c. Related: Prognostical (early 15c., pronostical).

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lacteal (adj.)
1650s, "pertaining to milk," earlier "milk-white" (1630s), from Latin lacteus "milky" (from lac "milk," from PIE root *g(a)lag- "milk") + -al (1). Other 17c. attempts at an adjective in English yielded lactary, lactaceous, lacteant, lacteous, lactescent, and, in a specialized sense ("milk-producing"), lactific.
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gregarious (adj.)

1660s, "disposed to live in flocks" (of animals), from Latin gregarius "pertaining to a flock; of the herd, of the common sort, common," from grex (genitive gregis) "flock, herd," from PIE *gre-g-, reduplicated form of root *ger- "to gather." Of persons, "sociable," first recorded 1789. Related: Gregariously; gregariousness.

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nosh (v.)

"to snack, to eat between meals," 1957, from Yiddish nashn "nibble," from Middle High German naschen, from Old High German hnascon, nascon "to nibble," from Proto-Germanic *(g)naskon. Related: Noshed; noshing. Earlier as a noun (1917) meaning "a restaurant," short for nosh-house.

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