Etymology
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fuckwit (n.)
"fool idiot," slang, c. 1970, originally British or Australian English, from fuck + wit (n.).
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fucking (adj.)
present-participle adjective from fuck (v.). As a mere intensive, attested from 1893, probably older.
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clusterfuck (n.)
"bungled or confused undertaking," 1969, U.S. military slang, from cluster + fuck, probably in the "bungle" sense. Earlier the compound meant "orgy" (1966).
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frig (v.)
"to move about restlessly," mid-15c., perhaps a variant of frisk (q.v.). As a euphemism for "to fuck" it dates from 1550s (frigging); from 1670s as "to masturbate." Related: Frigged; frigging.
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fucker (n.)

1590s, "one who copulates," agent noun from fuck (v.). By 1893 as a general term of abuse (or admiration).

DUCK F-CK-R. The man who has the care of the poultry on board a ſhip of war. ["Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 1796]
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naff (v.)

British slang word with varied senses, not all of them certainly connected; see Partridge, who lists two noun uses: "female pudenda" (c. 1845), which might be back-slang from fan, shortening of fanny (in the British sense); and "nothing," in prostitutes' slang from c. 1940; a verbal use, a euphemism for fuck (v.) in oaths, imprecations, expletives (as in naff off), 1959, "making it slightly less obvious than eff" [Partridge]; and an adjective naff "vulgar, common, despicable," which is said to have been used in 1960s British gay slang for "unlovely" and thence adopted into the jargons of the theater and the armed forces.

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abruption (n.)
Origin and meaning of abruption

c. 1600, "a sudden breaking off," from Latin abruptionem (nominative abruptio) "a breaking off," noun of action from past-participle stem of abrumpere "break off," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + rumpere "to break," from a nasalized form of the PIE root *runp- "to break" (see corrupt (adj.)).

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debark (v.2)

"to strip the bark off" (a tree), 1742, from de- "from, off" + bark (n.1). Related: Debarked; debarking.

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abscission (n.)
Origin and meaning of abscission

"removal or cutting away," early 15c., from Latin abscissionem (nominative abscissio) "a cutting off, a breaking off, interruption," noun of action from past-participle stem of abscindere "to cut off, divide, part, separate" (see abscissa).

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liftoff (n.)
also lift-off, "vertical take-off of a rocket, etc.," 1956, American English, from the verbal phrase, from lift (v.) + off (adv.). Earlier, of aircraft, simply lift (1879). Figurative use from 1967.
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