Etymology
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individualist (n.)
1839, "egoist, free-thinker," from individual + -ist, and compare individualism. Related: Individualistic.
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eleutherian (adj.)

"freely given, bountiful, liberal," 1620s, from Greek eleutherios "like a free man, noble-minded, frank, liberal," literally "freeing, delivering," also the title of Zeus as protector of political freedom, from eleutheria "freedom," from eleutheros "free, free man" (opposed to dolous "slave"), from PIE *leu-dheros, from root leudh- "grow up, come out" (see liberal (adj.)).

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disillusionment (n.)

"process of disillusioning; state of being free from illusion," 1855, from disillusion + -ment.

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freer (adj.)
comparative of free (adj.). See -er (2).
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delocalize (v.)

"free from limitations of locality," 1839, from de- "do the opposite of" + localize. Related: Delocalized; delocalizing.

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pâté (n.2)

1706, "small pie or pastry," from French pâté, from Old French paste, earlier pastée, from paste (see paste (n.)). Especially pâté de foie gras (1827), which was originally a pie or pastry filled with fatted goose liver; the word now generally is used of the filling itself.

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purify (v.)

mid-14c., purifien, "to free from spiritual pollution," from Old French purefier "purify, cleanse, refine" (12c.), from Latin purificare "to make pure," from purus "pure" (see pure) + combining form of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Meaning "free from extraneous matter" is recorded from late 14c. Related: Purified; purifying.

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leisure (adj.)
"free from business, idle, unoccupied," 1660s, from leisure (n.).
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freemason (n.)
late 14c., originally a traveling guild of masons with a secret code; in the early 17c. they began accepting honorary members and teaching them the secrets and lore, which was continued into or revived in the 17th century and by 1717 had developed into the secret fraternity of affiliated lodges known as Free and Accepted Masons (commonly abbreviated F. and A. M.). The accepted refers to persons admitted to the society but not belonging to the craft.

The exact origin of the free- is a subject of dispute. Some [such as Klein] see a corruption of French frère "brother," from frèremaçon "brother mason;" others say it was because the masons worked on "free-standing" stones; still others see them as "free" from the control of local guilds or lords [OED]. Related: freemasonic.
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unmoor (v.)
late 15c., "to free from moorings," from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + moor (v.). Related: Unmoored.
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