Etymology
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Zenobia 
fem. proper name, from Greek Zenobia, literally "the force of Zeus," from Zen, collateral form of Zeus, + bia "strength, force," cognate with Sanskrit jya "force, power" (see Jain).
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dynamic (n.)

"energetic force; motive force," 1894, from dynamic (adj.). As "manner of interaction," by 1978.

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bug off (v.)
"leave quickly," by 1956, perhaps from bugger off (see bugger (v.)), which chiefly is British (by 1920s) but was picked up in U.S. Air Force slang in the Korean War. Also see bug (v.3). To bug out "leave quickly, scram" is from 1953.
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forcible (adj.)
early 15c., "powerful, violent; done by force," from Old French forcible "strong, powerful, mighty," from forcier "conquer by violence" (see force (v.)). From 1550s as "possessing force." Related: Forcibly.
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outspoken (adj.)

"given to speaking freely, candid, free or bold of speech," 1808, originally Scottish, from out- + -spoken. According to OED, the past participle "has here a resultant force, as in 'well spoken', 'well read'." Related: Outspokenly; outspokenness. Earlier was outspeaking, in reference to the voice, "loud, resonant" (mid-15c.).

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forcemeat (n.)
also force-meat, "mincemeat, meat chopped fine and seasoned," 1680s, from force "to stuff," a variant of farce (q.v.) + meat.
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AEF 
also A.E.F., abbreviation of American Expeditionary Force, the U.S. military force sent to Europe in 1917 during World War I.
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drum (v.)

"beat or play time on, or announce by beating on, a drum," 1570s, from drum (n.). Meaning "to beat rhythmically or regularly" (with the fingers, etc.) is from 1580s. Meaning "force upon the attention by continual iteration" is by 1820.  To drum (up) business, etc., is American English 1839, from the old way of drawing a crowd or attracting recruits. To drum (someone) out "expel formally and march out by the beat of a drum" is originally military, by 1766.

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intension (n.)
c. 1600, "action of stretching; increase of degree or force," from Latin intensionem/intentionem (nominative intensio/intentio) "a stretching, straining," figuratively "exertion, effort," noun of action from past participle stem of intendere in its literal sense of "stretch out, strain" (see intend, and compare intention, which has the figurative sense). Related: Intensional.
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coact (v.)

"to compel, force," c. 1400, from Latin coactare "constrain, force," frequentative of cogere (past participle coactus) "to compel," also "curdle, collect" (see cogent). Related: Coacted; coacting; coaction; coactive. 

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