Etymology
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neolocal (adj.)

"Denoting a place of residence chosen by a newly-married couple which is independent of parental or family ties" [OED], 1949, from neo- "new" + local (adj.). Related: Neolocally.

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matriarch (n.)

"mother or woman who heads a family or tribe," c. 1600, from matri- "mother, woman" + -arch, abstracted from patriarch, ultimately from Greek arkhein "to rule" (see archon).

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canid (n.)
"a carnivorous mammal of the Canidae family" (dogs, wolves, foxes, jackals), 1879, from Modern Latin Canidae, from Latin canis "dog" (from PIE root *kwon- "dog") + -idae.
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domesticity (n.)

1721, "state of being a domestic servant;" 1726, "domestic character, home or family life;" see domestic + -ity. Perhaps modeled on French domesticité.

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trichomoniasis (n.)
1915, with -iasis + trichomonas, genus of a family of flagellate parasites, from tricho-, Latinized form of Greek trikho-, combining form of thrix (genitive trikhos) "hair" + -monas.
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offshoot (n.)
1670s, in figurative sense, of family trees; 1801 in general sense of "a derivative;" 1814 in literal sense, in reference to plants. From off + shoot (n.).
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Shenandoah 
originally a place name in Dutchess County, N.Y., from Oneida (Iroquoian) family name Skenondoah, derived from oskenon:to "deer." Later transferred to river and valley in Virginia.
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folks (n.)
"persons," Middle English, plural of folk (n.). Colloquial sense of "people of one's family" is from 1715. In Old English in plural use it meant only "peoples, nations."
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arnica (n.)
plant genus of the borage family, native to central Europe, 1753, Modern Latin, of unknown origin. Klein suggests Arabic arnabiyah, a name of a type of plant, as the ultimate source.
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Rothschild 

"millionaire, rich person," 1833, in reference to the international banking family descended from Mayer Amschel Rothschild (1744-1812) of Frankfurt. The surname is literally "red shield," a German house-name.

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