Etymology
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overwork (n.)

"work beyond a person's strength, excessive labor," 1819; see overwork (v.). Middle English ofer-werc, Old English ofer-geweorc (West Saxon) meant "a superstructure, a work raised over something," hence "sarcophagus, tomb."

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flourish (n.)

c. 1500, "a blossom," from flourish (v.). Meaning "an ostentatious waving of a weapon" is from 1550s; that of "excessive literary or rhetorical embellishment" is from c. 1600; in reference to decorative curves in penmanship, 1650s; as "a fanfare of trumpets," 1590s.

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red tape (n.)

"official routine or formula," especially "excessive bureaucratic rigmarole," 1736, in reference to the red tape formerly used in Great Britain (and the American colonies) for binding up legal and other official documents, which is mentioned from 1690s.

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Francophile (adj.)

"characterized by excessive fondness of France and the French," 1875, from Franco- + -phile. "A newspaper word" [OED]. Its opposite, Francophobe, is recorded from 1890, implied in Francophobic; Francophobia is from 1862. An earlier word was anti-Gallician (n.), attested from 1755.

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paternalism (n.)

1851, "feeling of a father for his children," from paternal + -ism. By 1866 "government as by a father over his children, undue solicitude on the part of the central government for the protection of the people," specifically "excessive governmental regulation of the private affairs and business methods of the people." Related: Paternalistic (1890).

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calmative (adj.)

"quieting excessive action," by 1831, from French calmatif; see calm (adj.) + -ative. A Greek-Latin hybrid; purists prefer sedative, but OED writes that "The Latinic suffix is here defensible on the ground of It. and Sp. calmar, F. calmer ...." Also as a noun, "a quieting drug" (1847).

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-phobia 

word-forming element meaning "excessive or irrational fear, horror, or aversion," from Latin -phobia and directly from Greek -phobia "panic fear of," from phobos "fear" (see phobia). In widespread popular use with native words from c. 1800. In psychology, "an abnormal or irrational fear." Related: -phobic.

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Puritanism (n.)

"strictness of religious life," 1570s, from Puritan + -ism. Originally in reference to specific doctrines and practices; from 1590s of excessive moral strictness generally. In this last sense it was famously defined by H.L. Mencken (1920) as "the haunting fear that someone, somewhere may be happy."

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exorbitant (adj.)

mid-15c., a legal term, "deviating from rule or principle, eccentric;" from Late Latin exorbitantem (nominative exorbitans), present participle of exorbitare "deviate, go out of the track," from ex "out of" (see ex-) + orbita "wheel track" (see orb). General sense of "excessive, immoderate" is from 1620s; of prices, rates, etc., from 1660s. Related: Exorbitantly.

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outre (adj.)

"exaggerated, extravagant, eccentric, passing the bounds of what is usual or proper," 1722, from French outré "exaggerated, excessive, extreme," past participle of outrer "to carry to excess, overdo, overstrain, exaggerate," from outre "beyond," from Latin ultra "beyond" (from suffixed form of PIE root *al- "beyond").

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