Etymology
Advertisement
geocentric (adj.)
"having reference to the Earth as its center," 1680s, from geo- + -centric. Related: Geocentrically; geocentrism (1882).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
clime (n.)

1540s, "a tract or region of the earth," shortening of climate (or a nativization of Latin clima). It might usefully take up the old, abandoned "horizontal region of the earth" sense of climate, but it is used chiefly by the poets, and they display no evident agreement on what they mean by it.

Related entries & more 
antoecian (adj.)

"pertaining to the people dwelling on the opposite side of the earth," 1860, from antoeci (plural) "people dwelling on the opposite side of the earth" (1620s), a Latinized form of Greek antoikoi, literally "dwellers opposite," from anti "opposite" (see anti-) + oikein "to dwell" (from PIE root *weik- (1) "clan").

Related entries & more 
tumulus (n.)
ancient burial mound, 1680s, from Latin tumulus "hillock, heap of earth, mound" (see tomb).
Related entries & more 
gadolinium (n.)
metallic element, with element ending -ium + gadolinia, an earth named 1886 by J.C. Marginac in honor of Johan Gadolin (1760-1852), Finnish mineralogist and chemist, who in 1794 first began investigation of the earth (subsequently called gadolinite, 1802) which eventually yielded this element and several others.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
extraterrestrial (adj.)

also extra-terrestrial, "occurring or originating outside the Earth," 1812, from extra- + terrestrial. As a noun from 1956.

Related entries & more 
meteorite (n.)

"rock or metallic mass of extraterrestrial origin that falls to earth after streaking across the sky as a meteor," 1818, from meteor + -ite. They were known from ancient times, but the idea that some such iron masses or rocks had fallen to earth from the sky attained credence among scientists c. 1800.

Related entries & more 
terraqueous (adj.)
"consisting of both land and water," 1650s, from combining form of Latin terra "earth" (from PIE root *ters- "to dry") + aqueous.
Related entries & more 
dysprosium (n.)

element, obtained 1906 from an earth discovered in 1886, the last to be extracted from the complex earth called yttria, and named dysprosia in reference to the difficulty of obtaining it, from Greek dysprositos "hard to get at, difficult of access," from dys- "bad, difficult" (see dys-) + prositos "approachable." With metallic element suffix -ium.

Related entries & more 
glebe (n.)

late 14c., "soil of the earth; cultivated land;" also "a piece of land forming part of a clergyman's benefice," from Old French glebe, from Latin gleba, glaeba "clod, lump of earth," possibly from a PIE *glem- or *glom-, which might mean "contain, embrace" or "ball," or might be two different roots. Possible cognates include Old English clamm "a tie, fetter;" Old High German klamma "trap, gorge;" Old Irish glomar "gag, curb;" Latin globus "sphere," gleba, glaeba "clod, lump of earth;" Old English clyppan "to embrace;" Lithuanian glėbys "armful," globti "to embrace, support."

Related entries & more 

Page 7