Etymology
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deny (v.)

early 14c., "declare to be untrue or untenable," from Old French denoiir "deny, repudiate, withhold," from Latin denegare "to deny, reject, refuse" (source of Italian dinegarre, Spanish denegar), from de "away" (see de-) + negare "refuse, say 'no,' " from Old Latin nec "not," from Italic base *nek- "not," from PIE root *ne- "not."

From late 14c. as "refuse, refuse to grant or give," also "refuse to acknowledge, disavow, disown." Sense of "refuse access to" is from 1660s. Related: Denied; denying.

I may not understand what you say, but I'll defend to your death my right to deny it. [Albert Alligator, "Pogo," Sept. 26, 1951] 
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denier (n.2)

"one who denies," c. 1400, agent noun from deny (v.).

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denuclearize (v.)

also denuclearise, "to deprive of nuclear arms, remove nuclear weapons from," 1958; see de- + nuclear + -ize. Related: Denuclearized; denuclearization.

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denigrate (v.)

1520s, "to sully or stain" (the reputation, character, etc.), from Latin denigratus, past participle of denigrare "to blacken; to defame," from de- "completely" (see de-) + nigr-, stem of niger "black" (see Negro), which is of unknown origin.

The figurative sense is oldest in English; the literal sense of "blacken, make black" is recorded from 1620s. But denigrate as a past-participle adjective meaning "darkened, discolored" is attested from early 15c. "Apparently disused in 18th c. and revived in 19th c." [OED]. Related: Denigrated; denigrating.

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denizen (n.)

early 15c., "a citizen, a dweller, an inhabitant," especially "legally established inhabitant of a city or borough, a citizen as distinguished from a non-resident native or a foreigner," from Anglo-French deinzein, denzein, (Old French deinzein) "one within" (the privileges of a city franchise; opposed to forein "one without"), from deinz "within, inside," from Late Latin deintus, from de- "from" + intus "within" (see ento-).

Historically, an alien admitted to certain rights of citizenship in a country; a naturalized citizen (but ineligible to public office). Formerly also an adjective, "within the city franchise, having certain rights and privileges of citizenship" (late 15c.). Compare foreign.

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denomination (n.)

late 14c., denominacioun, "a naming, act of giving a name to," from Old French denominacion "nominating, naming," from Latin denominationem (nominative denominatio) "a calling by anything other than the proper name, metonymy," noun of action from past-participle stem of denominare "to name," from de- "completely" (see de-) + nominare "to name," from nomen "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name").

From mid-15c. as "a class name, a collective designation," of things; of persons, "a society or collection of individuals," 1660s. From the first comes the monetary sense (1650s) from the second the meaning "religious sect" (1716).

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dent (n.)

early 14c., "a strike or blow," dialectal variant of Middle English dint, dunt (see dint); sense of "indentation, hollow mark made by a blow or pressure" is by 1560s, apparently by influence of indent.

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denude (v.)

early 15c. "strip or divest of all covering, lay bare" (implied in denuded), from Latin denudare "to lay bare, strip; uncover, expose," from de "away" (see de-) + nudare "to strip," from nudus "naked, bare" (see naked). In geology, "to wear away and remove surface matter, make bare the underlying rocks" (1845). Related: Denuding.

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al dente (adv.)
1935, Italian, literally "to the tooth," from Latin dentem (nominative dens) "tooth" (from PIE root *dent- "tooth"). Italian al represents a contraction of words from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + ille "that" (see le).
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dendrology (n.)

1708, "a treatise on trees;" by 1825 as "the natural history of trees;" see dendro- "tree" + -ology. Related: Dendrological; dendrologist.

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