Etymology
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numberless (adj.)

"innumerable, countless," 1570s, from number (n.) + -less.

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Soundex (n.)

phonetic coding system, 1959, from sound (n.1) + brand-name suffix -ex.

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boot (v.2)
1975, transitive, "start up (a computer) by causing an operating system to load in the memory," 1975, from bootstrap (v.), a 1958 derived verb from bootstrap (n.) in the computer sense "fixed sequence of instructions to load the operating system of a computer" (1953). This is from the notion of the first-loaded program pulling itself (and the rest) up by the bootstrap, an old expression for "better oneself by rigorous, unaided effort." Intransitive, of a computer operating system, from 1983. Related: Booted; booting.
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propagandize (v.)

1841, "to spread a system of principles," from propaganda + -ize. Related: Propagandized; propagandizing.

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nth 

by 1717, in algebra textbooks, in phrase to the nth, a mathematical term indicating an indefinite number, in which n is an abbreviation for (whole) number (n.). Figurative (non-mathematical) use is by 1852.

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Telex 
1932, "a communication system of teletypewriters," from tel(etype) ex(change).
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cluster (n.)

Old English clyster "a number of things growing naturally together," probably from the same root as clot (n.). Meaning "a number of persons, animals, or things gathered in a close body" is from c. 1400. Of stars, from 1727. Cluster-bomb attested by 1950.

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codification (n.)

"act or process of reducing to a code or system," 1817 (Bentham), noun of action from codify.

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change-over (n.)

"alteration from one system to another," 1907, from the verbal phrase; see change (v.) + over (adv.).

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closed (adj.)

"made shut, not open," c. 1200, past-participle adjective from close (v.). Closed circuit "complete, unbroken (electrical) circuit" is attested from 1827; closed shop"workplace in which only union members are employed" is from 1904; closed system first recorded 1896 in William James as "complete and unalterable system (of doctrines, etc.)." Later used in a physical sense, "system in which the total mass or energy remains constant."

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