Etymology
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crozier (n.)

"long staff ending in a hook or curve, carried by or before a bishop or archbishop on solemn occasions," late 13c., croiser (mid-13c. as a surname), "one who bears a bishop's staff, prelate's crosier-bearer," from Old French crocier, from Medieval Latin crociarius "bearer of a cross," from crocia "cross;" also from Old French croisier "one who bears or has to do with a cross" (see cross (n.)). The two words merged in Middle English. Technically, "the bearer of a bishop's pastoral staff;" erroneously applied to the staff itself since 1733.

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Union Jack 
1670s, from union + jack (n.); properly a small British union flag flown as the jack of a ship, but it has long been in use as a general name for the union flag. The Union flag (1630s) was introduced to symbolize the union of the crowns of England and Scotland (in 1603) and was formed of a combination of the cross saltire of St. Andrew and the cross of St. George. The cross saltire of St. Patrick was added 1801 upon the union of parliaments of Great Britain and Ireland.
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crossing (n.)

mid-15c., "a making of the sign of a cross;" 1530s, "a marking with a cross," verbal noun from cross (v.). From early 15c. as "place or action of passing across;" 1630s as "place where (a river, a road, etc.) is crossed;" from 1690s as "intersection" (originally of streets). Meaning "action of crossing out by drawing crossed lines through" is from 1650s. Crossing-gate is from 1876.

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ford (v.)
"to cross a body of water by walking on the bottom," 1610s, from ford (n.). Related: Forded; fording.
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sain (v.)

"to cross oneself; to mark or bless with the sign of the cross," Old English segnian, from Latin signare "to sign, mark, distinguish" (in Church Latin and Medieval Latin "to make the sign of the Cross"); see sign (n.). A common Germanic borrowing, cognate with Old Saxon segnon, Dutch zegenen, Old High German seganon, German segnen "to bless," Old Norse signa. Century Dictionary (1889) marks it "Obsolete or Scotch."

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crucify (v.)

mid-14c., "to put to death by nailing or otherwise affixing to a cross," from Old French crucifer crucefiier (12c., Modern French crucifier), from Vulgar Latin *crucificare, from Late Latin crucifigere "to fasten to a cross," from cruci, dative of Latin crux "cross" (see crux) + figere "to fasten, fix" (from PIE root *dheigw- "to stick, fix").

An ancient mode of capital punishment considered especially ignominious by the Romans and Greeks and reserved in general for slaves and highway robbers. In scripture, "subdue, mortify" (the flesh, etc.), early 14c. Figurative sense of "to torment" is from 1620s. Related: Crucified; crucifying.

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interlocutor (n.)
1510s, "one who speaks in a dialogue or conversation," agent noun from Latin interlocut-, past participle stem of interloqui "speak between; interrupt," from inter "between" (see inter-) + loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak").

In minstrel shows, the name of a straight-man character (1870) who was the questioner of the end men. Related: Interlocutory. Fem. forms include interlocutress (1858), interlocutrix (1846), interlocutrice (1848).
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crossword (adj.)

as the name of a game in which clues suggests words that are written in overlapping horizontal and vertical boxes in a grid, January 1914, from cross (adj.) + word (n.). The first one ran in the "New York World" newspaper Dec. 21, 1913, but was called word-cross. As a noun, 1925, short for crossword puzzle.

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crossed (adj.)

 "made in the shape of a cross, marked by a line drawn across," past-participle adjective from cross (v.). Figurative sense of "thwarted" is from 1620s. To be crossed out "cancelled by crossing lines" is by 1780. Crossed wires as figurative of confusion, miscommunication is by 1910. 

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traverse (v.)
early 14c., "pass across, over, or through," from Old French traverser "to cross, place across" (11c.), from Vulgar Latin *traversare, from Latin transversare "to cross, throw across," from Latin transversus "turn across" (see transverse). As an adjective from early 15c. Related: Traversed; traversing.
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