Etymology
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PASCAL 
high-level computer programming language, 1971, named for French scholar Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), who invented a calculating machine c. 1642.
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readout (n.)

also read-out, 1946 in the computer sense, "extraction or transfer of data from a storage device," from the verbal phrase; see read (v.) + out (adv.).

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neuroscience (n.)

"scientific study of the nervous system," 1963, from neuro- + science.

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housecraft (n.)
"domestic science," 1906, from house (n.) + craft (n.).
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browser (n.)

1845, "animal which browses," agent noun from browse (v.). From 1863 as "person who browses" among books. In the computer sense by 1982.

The first browser was invented at PARC by Larry Tesler, now a designer at Apple Computer. Tesler's first Smalltalk browser was a tree-structured device. It enabled programmers to hunt quickly for items in a Smalltalk dictionary. [InfoWorld magazine, vol. v, no. 4, Jan. 24, 1983]
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firewall (n.)
also fire-wall, 1851 as a physical wall meant to prevent the spread of fire in a structure, from fire (n.) + wall (n.). Computer sense (originally figurative) is by 1990.
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warcraft (n.)
"military science," c. 1400, from war (n.) + craft (n.).
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scroll (v.)
"to write down in a scroll," c. 1600, from scroll (n.). Sense of "show a few lines at a time" (on a computer or TV screen) first recorded 1981. Related: Scrolled; scrolling.
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hardware (n.)
mid-15c., "small metal goods," from hard (adj.) + ware (n.). In the sense of "physical components of a computer" it dates from 1947. Hardware store attested by 1789.
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conchology (n.)

"the science of shells and shellfish," 1776, from conch + -ology. Related: Conchologist; conchological.

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