Etymology
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purifier (n.)

1550s, "one who purifies," agent noun from purify. As a type of mechanical apparatus, from 1834 (in reference to coal gas). Purificator in the ecclesiastical sense of "cloth used to wipe the chalice, etc., during mass" is by 1853, an agent-noun from Latin purificare.

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Avis 

U.S. car rental company, according to company history founded 1946 at Willow Run Airport in Detroit by U.S. businessman Warren Avis and named for him.

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trannie (n.)
also tranny "transsexual person," 1983, from transsexual + -ie. In 1960s and '70s the word was used as a slang shortening of transistor radio and in car magazines for transmission.
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total (v.)
1716, "bring to a total," from total (n.). Intransitive sense "reach a total of" is from 1859. Meaning "to destroy one's car" first recorded 1954. Related: Totaled; totaling.
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sidetrack (n.)
also side-track, "railway siding," 1835, from side (adj.) + track (n.). The verb meaning "to move (a train car) onto a sidetrack" is from 1874; figurative sense of "to divert from the main purpose" is attested from 1881. Related: Sidetracked.
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dragster (n.)

"hot rod or constructed car designed for maximum engine efficiency with no regard for style," 1954, from drag (n.) in the racing sense + -ster, perhaps abstracted from roadster.

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bunk (n.1)
1758, "sleeping-berth in a vessel," later in a railroad car, etc., probably a shortened form of bunker (n.) in its sense of "seat." Bunk-bed (n.) attested by 1869.
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lysol (n.)
brown oily coal-tar solution used as a disinfectant, 1890, coined, perhaps in German, from Greek lysis "dissolution, dissolving" (from lyein "to unfasten, loose, loosen, untie," from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart") + -ol, element indicating "oil."
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carbon (n.)
non-metallic element occurring naturally as diamond, graphite, or charcoal, 1789, coined 1787 in French by Lavoisier as charbone, from Latin carbonem (nominative carbo) "a coal, glowing coal; charcoal," from PIE root *ker- (3) "heat, fire."

Carbon 14, long-lived radioactive isotope used in dating organic deposits, is from 1936. Carbon-dating (using carbon 14) is recorded from 1958. Carbon cycle is attested from 1912; carbon footprint was in use by 2001. Carbon-paper "paper faced with carbon, used between two sheets for reproduction on the lower of what is drawn or written on the upper" is from 1855, earlier it was carbonic paper (1850).
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clunker (n.)

"anything inferior," 1940s, agent noun from clunk (v.), probably in imitation of the sounds made by old machinery. Specific sense of "old car" was in use by 1936.

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