Etymology
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marksmanship (n.)

"character or skill of a marksman; dexterity in shooting at the mark," 1823, from marksman + -ship.

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atypical (adj.)
"having no distinct or typical character," 1847, from a- (3) "not" + typical. Related: Atypically.
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goofy (adj.)
1921, from goof + -y (2). The Disney character of that name began life c. 1929 as "Dippy Dawg."
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prudish (adj.)

"having the character or manner of a prude; prim, rigid, severe," 1717, from prude (adj.) + -ish. Related: Prudishly; prudishness.

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sanguinity (n.)

late 15c., "consanguinity, blood-relation," a sense now obsolete; see sanguine + -ity. Meaning "quality or character of being sanguine" is by 1737. 

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snobbish (adj.)
1840, "pertaining to snobs," from snob + -ish. Meaning "with the character of a snob" is from 1849. Related: Snobbishly; snobbishness.
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Jeeves 
personification of the perfect valet, 1930, from character in P.G. Wodehouse's novels. The surname is attested from 1120, perhaps from a pet form of Genevieve.
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mischaracterize (v.)

also mischaracterise, "impute a wrong character to," by 1798, from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + characterize. Related: Mischaracterized; mischaracterizing; mischaracterization.

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pedanticism (n.)

"a pedantic notion or expression," by 1836, from pedantic + -ism. Earlier was pedantism (1590s) "the character or style of a pedant."

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manliness (n.)

late 14c., manlinesse, "quality of possessing distinctly attributes considered befitting to a man, character or conduct worthy of a man" (boldness, courage, humanity). from manly + -ness.

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