Etymology
Advertisement
outlay (n.)

"act or fact of laying out (especially money) or expending; that which is laid out or expended," 1798, originally Scottish, from out- + lay (v.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
fallout (n.)

also fall-out, "radioactive particles," 1950, from fall (v.) + out (adv.).

Related entries & more 
efflux (n.)

1640s, "act or state of flowing out," also "that which flows out," from Latin effluxus, noun use of past participle of effluere "to flow out," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent)

Related entries & more 
decoupage (n.)

"decoration of a surface with an applied paper cut-out," by 1957, from French découpage, literally "the act of cutting out," from decouper "to cut out" (12c., Old French decoper), from dé- "out" (see de-) + couper "to cut" (see chop (v.1)).

Related entries & more 
exclude (v.)

"to shut out, debar from admission or participation, prevent from entering or sharing," mid-14c., from Latin excludere "keep out, shut out, hinder," from ex "out" (see ex-) + claudere "to close, shut" (see close (v.)). Related: Excluded; excluding.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
export (v.)

by 1610s, "carrying out of a place;" perhaps from late 15c., from Latin exportare "to carry out, bring out; send away, export," from ex "out, away" (see ex-) + portare "to carry," from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over." The sense of "send out (commodities) from one country to another" is first recorded in English 1660s. Related: Exported; exporting; exporter.

Related entries & more 
expunction (n.)

"act of expunging or erasing, removal by erasure, a blotting out or leaving out," c. 1600, from Latin expunctionem (nominative expunctio), noun of action from past-participle stem of expungere "prick out, blot out, mark for deletion" (see expunge).

Related entries & more 
egress (n.)

1530s, "act of going out," from Latin egressus "a going out," noun use of past participle of egredi "go out," from ex "out" (see ex-) + -gredi, combining form of gradi "step, go" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go"). Perhaps a back-formation from egression (early 15c.). Meaning "place of exit" is from 1670s. "One who goes out" is an egressor.

Related entries & more 
effluvium (n.)

1640s, from Latin effluvium "a flowing out, an outlet," from effluere "to flow out," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent). Related: Effluvial.

Related entries & more 
outback (n.)

"back-country, interior regions of Australia," 1907, Out Back, Australian English, originally an adverb, "out in the back settlements" (1878), from out (adv.) + back (adv.).

Related entries & more 

Page 7