Etymology
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off-scouring (n.)

"rejected matter, that which is vile or despised," 1520s; literally "that which is scoured off;" from off (prep.) + verbal noun from scour (v.1) "cleanse by hard rubbing."

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off-rhyme (n.)

"partial or near rhyme," 1938, from off (prep.) + rhyme (n.).

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shut-off (n.)

1869, "something which shuts off;" 1889, "cessation of flow," from the verbal phrase, which is attested from 1824, "turn off, prevent the passage of (gas, steam) by closing a valve, etc."

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deport (v.2)
Origin and meaning of deport

"banish, transport or carry off from one country to another, especially forcibly," 1640s, from French déporter, from Latin deportare "carry off, transport, banish, exile," from de "off, away" (see de-) + portare "to carry," from PIE *prto-, suffixed form of root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over." Associated by folk etymology with portus "harbor." Related: Deported; deporting.

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asportation (n.)

"a carrying away or off" (legal), c. 1500, from Latin asportationem (nominative asportatio) "a carrying away," noun of action from past-participle stem of asportare "to carry off," from abs- "away" (see ab-) + portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over").

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loot (v.)

"to plunder; carry off as loot," 1821, from loot (n.). Related: Looted; looting.

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rapine (n.)

"plunder; the violent seizure and carrying off of property," early 15c., from Old French rapine (12c.) and directly from Latin rapina "act of robbery, plundering, pillage," from rapere "seize, carry off, rob" (see rapid).

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deportation (n.)

"a carrying away from one country to another or to a distant place," 1590s, from French déportation, from Latin deporationem (nominative deportatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of deportare "carry off, transport, banish, exile," from de "off, away" (see de-) + portare "to carry," from PIE *prto-, suffixed form of root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over."

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defer (v.1)
Origin and meaning of defer

"to delay, put off, postpone," late 14c., differren, deferren, from Old French diferer (14c.) and directly from Latin differre "carry apart, scatter, disperse;" also "be different, differ;" also "defer, put off, postpone," from assimilated form of dis- "away from" (see dis-) + ferre "to bear, carry," from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry." Etymologically identical with differ; their spelling and pronunciation were differentiated from 15c., perhaps partly by association of this word with delay. Related: Deferred; deferring

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water-closet (n.)

"privy with a waste-pipe and means to carry off the discharge by a flush of water," 1755, from water (n.1) + closet (n.).

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