Etymology
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brocade (n.)
"silken fabric variegated with gold and silver or otherwise ornamented," 1560s, from Spanish brocado, corresponding to Italian broccato "embossed cloth," originally past participle of broccare "to stud, set with nails," from brocco (Spanish broca) "small nail," from Latin broccus "projecting, pointed" (see broach (n.)).
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horrid (adj.)

early 15c., "hairy, shaggy, bristling," from Latin horridus "bristly, prickly, rough, horrid, frightful, rude, savage, unpolished," from horrere "to bristle with fear, shudder" (see horror). Meaning "horrible, causing horror" is from c. 1600. Sense weakened 17c. to "unpleasant, offensive."

[W]hile both [horrible and horrid] are much used in the trivial sense of disagreeable, horrible is still quite common in the graver sense inspiring horror, which horrid tends to lose .... [Fowler]

Related: Horridly.

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stipple (v.)
"paint with dots," 1670s, from Dutch stippelen "to make points," frequentative of stippen "to prick, speckle," from stip "a point," perhaps ultimately from PIE root *st(e)ig- "pointed" (see stick (v.)), or from *steip- "to stick, compress." Related: Stippled; stippling.
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bodkin (n.)
c. 1300, badeken, boydekin, "short, small dagger, pointed weapon," of unknown origin. The ending suggests a diminutive formation, and Celtic has been suggested as the source of the primitive, "In default of finding it elsewhere" [OED], but Century Dictionary rejects this.
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crocket (n.)

early 14c., croket, "ornamental roll or lock of hair," from Anglo-French crocket, from northern French form of Old French crochet, croquet, literally "a hook" (see crochet (n.)). In medieval architecture, "pointed ornamental device on a sloping pinnacle, gable, etc.," late 14c. Related: Crocketed.

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pentagram (n.)

"five-pointed star or other figure, a pentacle," 1820, from Greek pentagrammon, noun use of neuter of adj. pentagrammos "having or consisting of five lines," from pente "five" (from PIE root *penkwe- "five") + gramma "letter, character, what is written" (see -gram).

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accipiter (n.)

raptorial bird, 1708, from Latin accipiter, a generic name for birds of prey, especially the common hawk. According to de Vaan, "generally assumed" to be from a Proto-Italic *aku-petri- "having pointed (that is, 'swift') wings" (see acro- + ptero-) and compares Greek okypteros "with swift wings," Sanskrit asu-patvan- "flying swiftly," "all of which are used as epithets to birds of prey." Under this theory the initial acc- is by influence of the verb accipere "to take" (whence also Latin acceptor "falcon;" see accept). Or the sense could be literal, "with pointed wings." The proper plural would be accipitres. Related: Accipitral; accipitrine (1809).

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acne (n.)
skin eruption common during puberty, 1813, from Modern Latin, from aknas, a 6c. Latin clerical misreading of Greek akmas, accusative plural of akme "point" (see acme), from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce." The "pointed" pimples are the source of the medical use.
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arugula (n.)
edible cruciform plant (Eruca sativa) used originally in the Mediterranean region as a salad, 1967, the American English and Australian form of the name (via Italian immigrants), from a dialectal variant of Italian ruchetta, a diminutive form of ruca-, from Latin eruca, a name of some cabbage-like plant, from PIE *gher(s)-uka-, from root *ghers- "to bristle" (see horror).

In England, the usual name is rocket (see rocket (n.1)), which is from Italian ruchetta via French roquette. It also sometimes is called hedge mustard.
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tip (n.1)
c. 1400, "extreme end of something, top of something round or pointed, metal attachment to the end of something," from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch tip "utmost point, extremity, tip" (compare German zipfel, a diminutive formation); or from a Scandinavian source (compare Old Norse typpi).
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