Etymology
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Pontic (adj.)

"of, found in, or pertaining to the Black Sea," 1550s, from Latin Ponticus, from Greek Pontikos, from Pontos "the Black Sea and the regions around it," literally "the sea," from a variant of the PIE root *pent- "to tread, go" that also produced Latin pons (genitive pontis) "bridge, passage;" see find (v.).

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overconfident (adj.)

also over-confident, "confident to excess," 1610s, from over- + confident. Related: Overconfidently.

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overpopulate (v.)

also over-populate, "to overrun with too many people," 1828 (implied in overpopulated), from over- + populate (v.). Related: Overpopulating. Overpopulous "over-populated" is attested from 1670s.

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overrun (v.)

also over-run, Middle English overrennen, from Old English oferyrnan "to run across, pass over;" see over- + run (v.). Meaning "continue beyond a specified time" is from early 14c. Meaning "to ravage (a land), maraud, plunder" is by mid-14c. Of weeds, etc., "to grow over, cover all over," by 1660s. The noun meaning "excess expenditure over budget" is from 1956. Related: Overran; overrunning.

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rialto (n.)

"an exchange, a mart," by 1869, a reference to the famous Ponte de Rialto of Venice and the market or exchange that stood on the east end of it and eventually expanded to cover the bridge itself. The name is contracted from Rivoalto and named for the canal (Latin rivus altus "deep stream") which it crosses.

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overexcitement (n.)

also over-excitement, "excess of excitement," 1815, from over- + excitement.

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overpass (n.)

"stretch of road that passes over another," 1929, American English, from over- + pass (v.). + Overpass has been a verb since late c. 1300, "to go over, go across."

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hyper- 
word-forming element meaning "over, above, beyond," and often implying "exceedingly, to excess," from Greek hyper (prep. and adv.) "over, beyond, overmuch, above measure," from PIE root *uper "over."
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transitive (adj.)
"taking a direct object" (of verbs), 1570s (implied in transitively), from Late Latin transitivus (Priscian) "transitive," literally "passing over (to another person)," from transire "cross over, go over, pass over, hasten over, pass away," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). Related: Transitively.
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transit (n.)
Origin and meaning of transit
mid-15c., "act or fact of passing across or through," from Latin transitus "a going over, passing over, passage," verbal noun from past participle of transire "cross over, go over, pass over, hasten over, pass away," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). Meaning "a transit of a planet across the sun" is from 1660s. Meaning "public transportation" is attested from 1873.
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