Etymology
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besmirch (v.)

"to soil with soot or mud, to sully," now usually figurative, 1590s, from be- + smirch.

Our Gayness and our Gilt are all besmyrcht. ["Henry V," IV.iii.110]

Related: Besmirched; besmirching.

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belated (adj.)
1610s, "overtaken by night" from staying too late or being delayed, past-participle adjective from belate "to make late, detain," from be- + late. Sense of "coming past due, behind date" is from 1660s. Related: Belatedly; belatedness.
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begrudge (v.)
late 14c., bigrucchen, "grumble over, find fault, show dissatisfaction," especially "envy the possession of," from be- + Middle English grucchen "to murmur, find fault with, be angry" (see grudge). Related: Begrudged; begrudging; begrudgingly.
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art (v.)
second person singular present indicative of be; Old English eart. Also see are (v.). It became archaic in the 1800s.
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bedraggle (v.)

"to soil or wet by dragging in dirt or mud or from being rained upon," 1727, from be- + draggle "to drag or draw along damp ground or mud." Also in a similar sense were bedrabble (mid-15c.), bedaggle (1570s).

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beside (prep., adv.)
c. 1200, from Old English be sidan "by the side of" (only as two words), from be- + sidan dative of side (n.). By 1200 as one word and used as both adverb and preposition. The alternative Middle English meaning "outside" is preserved in beside oneself "out of one's wits" (late 15c.).
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forebear (n.)
"ancestor," late 15c., from fore "before" + be-er "one who exists;" agent noun from be. Originally Scottish. Related: Forebears.
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betake (v.)
c. 1200, "to hand over," from be- + take (v.). From the beginning confused in form and sense with the older beteach. From c. 1400 in the etymologically proper sense "to take, accept." Its reflexive sense "take oneself" (to) emerged mid-15c. Related: Betook; betaken.
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beteach (v.)
Old English betæcan "give up to, impart, deliver; appoint, set apart, dedicate," from be- + teach (v.). Form and sense confused with betake. Meaning "impart, teach" is from c. 1300; the word was obsolete or archaic from 16c. Related: Betaught; beteaching.
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beyond (prep., adv.)
Old English begeondan "on the other side of, from the farther side," from be- "by," here probably indicating position, + geond "yonder" (prep.); see yond. A compound not found elsewhere in Germanic. From late 14c. as "further on than," 1530s as "out of reach of." To be beyond (someone) "to pass (someone's) comprehension" is by 1812.
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