Etymology
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Mantua 

city and former duchy in northern Italy, probably from Mantus, name of the Etruscan god of the Underworld. Virgil was born nearby. Related: Mantuan.

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Pilates 
c. 1980, physical fitness regimen developed c. 1920 by German-born physical fitness teacher Joseph Pilates (1883-1967).
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Chaplinesque (adj.)
1921, from Charlie Chaplin (1889-1977), British-born silent movie star. The surname is attested from c. 1200, from Old French chapelain "priest."
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Forbes 
U.S. financial publication, founded 1917 by Scottish-born Wall Street journalist B.C. Forbes (1880-1954) and publisher Walter Drey.
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Danielle 

fem. proper name, from Daniel. In U.S., little used before c. 1940 and in the top 20 for girls born from 1984-1994.

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love-child (n.)

"child born out of wedlock, child of illicit love," 1798, from love (n.) + child. Compare German Liebeskind. Earlier was love brat (17c.).

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nisei (n.)

"American born of Japanese parents," from Japanese ni- "second" + sei "generation." Use of the word was limited to U.S. West Coast until c. 1942.

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renascent (adj.)

"springing or rising into being again," 1727, from Latin renascentem (nominative renascens), present participle of renasci "be born again" (see Renaissance).

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Archimedean (adj.)
1798, "of or pertaining to Archimedes" (Latinized from Greek Arkhimedes), celebrated practical mathematician of antiquity, born in Syracuse 3c. B.C.E. Archimedean screw is from 1806.
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quintuplet (n.)

1873, "a set of five things" (originally in music), from quintuple (adj.) with ending from triplet. In plural, "five children born at one birth" it is recorded by 1889.

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