Etymology
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cutback (n.)

also cut-back, "reduction" in expenditures, etc., by 1943, from the verbal phrase; see cut (v.) + back (adv.).

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humpback (adj.)
also hump-back, 1690s, from hump (n.) + back (n.). As a noun from 1709. Humpback whale is from 1725.
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backdate (v.)
also back-date, "assign a date to earlier than the actual one," by 1881 (implied in back-dated), from back (adv.) + date (v.1). Compare antedate. Related: Backdated; backdating.
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backwater (n.)
also back-water, late 14c., "water behind a dam," from back (adj.) + water (n.1). Hence flat water without a current near a flowing river, as in a mill race (1820); figurative use of this for any flat, dull place is from 1879.
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backlist (n.)
1934 in publisher's jargon, "books that have been in publication for some time (prior to the current season) and are still in print;" see back (adj.) + list (n.1). As a verb, "to put on the back list," from 1983. Related: Backlisted.
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backstop (n.)
1819, "something at the back as a barrier;" see back (adj.) + stop (n.). In U.S. baseball, from 1889, "fence a short distance behind the catcher;" figurative extension to "catcher on a baseball team" is from 1890. The verb is attested from 1956 in the sense of "support." Related: Backstopped; backstopping.
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rollback (n.)

also roll-back; 1937 as "action of rolling backward;" 1942, American English, as "a reduction" in prices, etc., a journalist's and advertiser's word, from the verbal phrase; see roll (v.) + back (adv.).

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payback (n.)

also pay-back, 1946, "net return on profits from an investment," from the verbal phrase, from pay (v.) + back (adj.). Meaning "revenge, retaliation" is by 1957.

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background (n.)
"the ground or situation to the rear of what is in front or most engaging of the attention," 1670s, from back (adj.) + ground (n.); original sense was theatrical, later applied to painting ("part of a picture representing what is furthest from the spectator"), 1752. Figurative sense is first attested 1854.
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horseback (n.)
"the back of a horse," especially the part upon which a rider sits, late 14c., from horse (n.) + back (n.). The alternative formerly was described in jest as footback [Century Dictionary].
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