Etymology
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attorney-general (n.)

"first ministerial law-officer of a state," 1530s (late 13c. in Anglo-French); see attorney + general (adj.). The word-order is French (subject first, adjective second), hence the eccentric English plural, attorneys-general.

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generalship (n.)

1590s, "the functions of a general" (a sense now obsolete); 1620s, "the office of a general;" from general (n.) + -ship. The meaning "management of an army; the military skill or conduct of a commander" is by 1770.

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Walter 

masc. proper name, from Old North French Waltier (Old French Gualtier, Modern French Gautier), of Germanic origin and cognate with Old High German Walthari, Walthere, literally "ruler of the army," from waltan "to rule" (from Proto-Germanic *waldan, from PIE root *wal- "to be strong") + hari "host, army" (see harry). Walter Mitty (1939) is from title character in "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" by U.S. short story writer James Thurber (1894-1961).

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US 

also U.S., abbreviation of United States, attested from 1834. U.S.A. for "United States of America" is recorded from 1885; before that it generally meant "U.S. Army."

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dogface (n.)

"soldier in the U.S. Army," especially an infantryman, by 1941, from dog (n.) + face (n.). Said to have been originally a contemptuous name given by the Marines.

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Buncombe (n.)

see bunk (n.2). The North Carolina county was named for Edward Buncombe (1742–1778), North Carolina revolutionary leader and colonel in the American army.

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recruitment (n.)

"act or business of recruiting, act of raising new supplies of men for an army or navy," 1795, from recruit (v.) + -ment. The earlier noun was recruiting (1640s).

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forester (n.)

late 13c. (late 12c. as a surname), "officer in charge of a forest," from Old French forestier "forest ranger, forest-dweller" (12c., also, as an adjective, "wild, rough, coarse, unsociable"), from forest (see forest (n.)).

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bodacious (adj.)

1837 (implied in bodaciously), Southern U.S. slang, perhaps from bodyaciously "bodily, totally," or a blend of bold and audacious, which suits the earliest attested sense of the word. Popularized anew by the 1982 Hollywood film "An Officer and a Gentleman."

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postmaster (n.)

1510s, "officer who has charge of a post-station and provides post-horses," from post (n.3) + master (n.). Later "official who has superintendence of a post office." Postmaster general "chief of a postal system" is by 1620s.

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