Etymology
Advertisement
-archy 

word-forming element meaning "rule," from Latin -archia, from Greek -arkhia "rule," from arkhos "leader, chief, ruler," from arkhē "beginning, origin, first place," verbal noun of arkhein "to be the first," hence "to begin" and "to rule" (see archon).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
arcana (n.)

"hidden things, mysteries," 1590s, a direct adoption of the Latin plural of arcanum "a secret, a mystery," an important word in alchemy, from neuter of adjective arcanus "secret, hidden, private, concealed" (see arcane). It was occasionally mistaken for a singular and pluralized as arcanas, because arcana is far more common than arcanum.

Related entries & more 
arch-enemy (n.)

also archenemy, "a chief enemy," 1540s, from arch- + enemy. Originally especially Satan.

Related entries & more 
arch- 

also archi-, word-forming element meaning "chief, principal; extreme, ultra; early, primitive," from Latinized form of Greek arkh-, arkhi- "first, chief, primeval," combining form of arkhos "a chief, leader, commander," arkhein "be first, begin" (see archon).

Related entries & more 
archaeologist (n.)

1824; see archaeology + -ist. Other early forms were archaeologian (1820), archaeologue (1839, from French archéologue). Greek arkhaiologos meant "antiquary."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
-arch 

word-forming element meaning "a ruler," from Greek arkhos "leader, chief, ruler," from arkhē "beginning, origin, first place," verbal noun of arkhein "to be the first," hence "to begin" and "to rule" (see archon).

Related entries & more 
architrave (n.)

1560s as an architectural feature of columns, "lower division of an entablature; part which rests immediately on the column and supports those portions of the structure above it;" extended 1660s to window parts, from Italian architrave, from Latin archi- "beginning, origin" (see archon) + Italian trave "beam," from Latin trabem (nominative trabs) "beam, timber" (from PIE root *treb- "dwelling," for which see tavern).

Related entries & more 
archaeology (n.)

c. 1600, "ancient history," from French archéologie (16c.) or directly from Greek arkhaiologia "the study of ancient things;" see archaeo- + -ology. The meaning "scientific study of ancient peoples and past civilizations" is recorded by 1825.

Related entries & more 
archaeopteryx (n.)

Jurassic fossil animal long considered the oldest known bird (in 21c. new candidates emerged), 1871, from German (1861), coined in Modern Latin by German paleontologist Christian Erich Hermann von Meyer, from archaeo- "ancient, primitive" + Greek pteryx "wing" (from PIE root *pet- "to rush, to fly"). Discovered (first as a single feather) by Andreas Wagner in 1860 or '61 in Bavaria.

Related entries & more 

Page 7